Slope Point Trees: Beauty Created By Force Of Nature

Photo by Seabird Nz

There are a lot of unusual sight around the globe, but Slope Point of New Zealand is differently natural wonder. Slope Point is the southernmost tip on New Zealand’s South Island. The place is systematically blasted by great force of cold wind, that causes the trees to bend and transform their appearance. The wind from the Southern Ocean attacked the trees, as they grew. In order to be least resistant, the tree brunches turned to the opposite direction, so they got windswept appearance. Continue »

Yao Ethnic Women Keep Long Hair Tradition Alive

The Yao nationality is a government classification for various minorities in China. They form one of the 55 ethnic minority groups officially recognized by the People’s Republic of China, where they reside in the mountainous terrain of the southwest and south. They also form one of the 54 ethnic groups officially recognized by Vietnam. In the last census in 2000, they numbered 2,637,421 in China, and roughly 470,000 in Vietnam.

Photo by Lu Boan/Xinhua

The Huangluo Village of the Yao ethnic group locates at the Longji Terraces in Heping Town of Longsheng County in Guilin. Women here have the tradition of keeping long hair. They believe that long hair brings good luck and fortune. The average length of hair of 180 women in the village is 1.7 meters. Continue »

Crystal Mill: The River Shack That Helped Colorado Ore Miners

Photo by Romy Lee

The Crystal Mill or historically known as the Sheep Mountain Mill, is one of the most beautiful, picturesque and reputed to be the most photographed area in Colorado state. It’s located above the Crystal River in Crystal, Colorado, between the towns of Glenwood Springs and Aspen on Highway 82, seven miles southeast of Marble. Continue »

Photographer Captures Remarkable Images Of Largest Cave In The World


Using standard DSLR cameras and a GoPro HERO4 attached to a camera drone, Ryan Deboodt has captured images of one of the world’s best kept secrets. Hang Son Soong, located in Vietnam, is the largest known cave in the world. The largest chamber in the cave is more than 3.1 miles long, 490 feet wide, and 660 feet high with stalagmites that reach up to 230 feet tall. Continue »

Cozy School Bus Conversion


According to the bus owner: “It’s a 1997 school bus, not too long, not too short. There is a sofa, table, woodstove and full bed. There is ambient light and electricity on the bus as well as several candles. It has a wood floor and wood wall siding. It’s in a private area of my yard and in the warmer weather there is a hammock and tree swing to be enjoyed just outside the bus.” Continue »

800 Human Sculptures Found In This Creepy Japanese Village


Japanese photographer Ken Ohki who goes by the name Yukison was traveling in Toyama Prefecture, Japan, when he stumbled upon one of the creepiest arrays of human-like sculptures scattered around the village of Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato (The Village Where You Can Meet Buddhist Statues). Continue »

Let’s Visit Donja Lokosnica, The Serbian “Paprika Capital Of The World”

Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters

Donja Lokosnica is the Serbian “capital of paprika”, since almost all of the 1300 inhabitants are involved in growing paprika. As autumn approaches, the whole village turns red, because of many threads of dried peppers, that hang around Lokosnica, waiting for their winter use. Each of these paprika threads is handmade, still dried according to traditional techniques, assisted solely by the sun and fresh air. Continue »

Take Your Balls And Go Home: The World’s Most Dangerous Hiking Trail

Photo by richard0428

Mount Hua, or Hua Shan, or Xiyue located near the city of Huayin in Shaanxi province, about 120 kilometres (75 mi) east of Xi’an. It is one of China’s Five Great Mountains, and has a long history of religious significance. Originally classified as having three peaks, in modern times the mountain is classified as five main peaks, of which the highest is the South Peak at 2,154.9 metres (7,070 ft). Continue »

Fascinating Underwater Museum Of The Communist Era At Cape Tarkhankut Of Crimea

Photo by Andrey Nekrasov / Alamy Stock Photo / TASS

Cape Tarkhankut, Crimea is a home of an unusual underwater museum. In 1992, diver Vladimir Borumenski installed the first sculptures of Soviet leaders at a depth of 50 feet. Sculptures were already dismantled in the Crimean cities and towns, so it was kind of a recycling project. Borumenski planned to complete the Soviet museum, with sculptures of Mao Zedong, Mussolini and Napoleon, but didn’t follow through. Here: Pink Gagarin. Continue »

Zombie Boy Launches “Platform 15” At Thorpe Park’s New Halloween Attraction In London


Zombie Boy, who holds a Guinness World Record for most bones inked on a human body, gave Londoners a fright this morning as he was spotted at commuter hotspots across the capital to promote Thorpe Park’s new Halloween attraction in London. Continue »

Yetis To Roam NYC Streets In ‘Expedition Unknown’ Promo

Photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

Travel Channel’s buzz-building efforts behind unscripted, four-part series Expedition Unknown: Hunt for the Yeti will culminate in a New York City-based, multisite street campaign. The special edition of Expedition Unknown — sending explorer Josh Gates to Nepal and Bhutan in search of the legendary abominable snowman — will hit the streets of Manhattan in a series-branded coffee truck offering passersby freshly-made iced coffees, tying in the cold drink with the frigid weather theme of the special and the environment that the Yeti is said to live in. Continue »

He Lives In A Tree, Doesn’t Wear Shoes, And Brushes His Teeth With A Pinecone


If you were to meet this guy in the woods, especially if it’s nighttime, you’d probably think that it’s a local troll or a yeti. However, in reality, he’s no yeti. His name is Mick Dodge, and before deciding to live in the woods, he was a marine for six years at Fort Lewis. It is hard to tell what moved him to leave the busy life of the city and start living in the Hoh Rain Forest. It could have been that he decided the leave the stressful life of the city, or maybe he simply loves the solitary life of a hermit. Another thing that is peculiar about Mick Dodge is that most of the time he walks barefoot, hence the nickname “The Barefoot Sensei”. Continue »

Giant Crystal Cave In Naica, Mexico – The Place Where Superman Was Born


Cave of the Crystals or Giant Crystal Cave is a cave connected to the Naica Mine 300 metres (980 ft) below the surface in Naica, Chihuahua, Mexico. The main chamber contains giant selenite crystals (gypsum, CaSO4·2 H2O), some of the largest natural crystals ever found. The cave’s largest crystal found to date is 12 m (39 ft) in length, 4 m (13 ft) in diameter and 55 tons in weight. The cave is extremely hot with air temperatures reaching up to 58 °C (136 °F) with 90 to 99 percent humidity. The cave is relatively unexplored due to these factors. Without proper protection people can only endure approximately ten minutes of exposure at a time. Continue »

Catalonia’s Human Towers: The Art Of Castells

Photo by Lluis Gene/AFP Photo

The 26th annual Human Tower Competition took place in the city of Tarragona in the Spanish autonomous region of Catalonia. The tradition of building human towers or “castells” dates back to the 18th century and takes place during festivals in Catalonia, where “colles” (or teams) compete to build the tallest and most structurally-complex towers. The structure of the “castells” varies depending on their complexity. A “castell” is considered completely successful when it is loaded and unloaded without falling apart. Continue »

Rescue ‘Fortress’ In Tanzania Protects Albinos From Human Hunters

The rescue centres in Tanzania protect albino people from the vicious hunters who sell their body parts to witch doctors. Photojournalist Ana Palacios, 43, visited the centre in Tanzania three times between 2012 and 2016 to find out more about the plight of albino people. Persecution of albinism is rooted in the belief that the body parts can transmit magical powers, however, they are also ostracised by those who believe that they are cursed and bring bad luck. The Tanzanian government has been forced to set up special centres to protect people with albinism from harm.

The women who flee to the centre with their albino children also act as guardians for the other albino children who have been abandoned at the centre in Kabanga Refuge Centre, Tanzania, 2012. (Photo by Ana Palacios/Barcroft Images) Continue »