Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race In Alaska, Part 1

1
Richie Diehl team charges out of the chute over trucked-in snow at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

2
Kelly Maixner’s team charges out of the chute at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

3
Richie Diehl team charges out of the chute over trucked-in snow at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

4
Kelly Maixner’s team charges out of the chute at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

5
Jan Steves’ dogs await for the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

6
A dog from Katherine Keith’s team awaits for the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

7
Christian Turner’s dogs tug on the lines as they approach the starting line of the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

8
Dogs from Michelle Phillips’s team play as they wait for the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

9
A dog from Zoya DeNure’s team watches other racers from between her legs at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

10
Four-time Iditarod champion Jeff King and IditaRider June Simpson (seated) navigate the slushy and quickly melting snow trucked-in and laid down on 4th avenue at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

11
Dogs from Michelle Phillips’s team play as they wait for the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

12
Dogs on Rob Cooke’s teams pull and jump on the line as their turn approaches at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

13
Bryan Bearss of Anchorage, with IditaRider Halley Knigge (seated) from Tacoma, Washington,charges down 4th Avenue at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

14
Gavis Schroeser, musher Nathan Schroeder’s son, attends to one of the team’s dogs before the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

15
Dogs from Justin Savidis’s team watch from the truck before the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

16
Cindy Abbott from Irvine, California gets a quick hug from one of her dogs at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

17
Bryan Bearss of Anchorage, with IditaRider Halley Knigge (seated) from Tacoma, Washington,charges down 4th Avenue at the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

18
A dog from Alan Eischens kennel on an unseasonable rainy morning await for the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

19
A sled dog has its collar removed in preparation for the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

20
A sled dog enjoys a scratch on the head before the 2015 ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race in downtown Anchorage, Alaska March 7, 2015. The timed portion of the race, which typically lasts nine days or longer, begins on Monday in Fairbanks, about 300 miles (482 km) away. Traditionally held in Willow, the timed start was moved to Fairbanks this year to accommodate an alternate trail selected after race officials deemed sections of the traditional path unsafe. REUTERS/Mark Meyer

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