Toward A Concrete Utopia: The Monumental Beauty Of Yugoslavia Brutalist Architecture


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Laundry hangs out to dry outside of Block 23 in an apartment neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia. Brutalism, an architectural style popular in the 1950s and 1960s, based on crude, block-like forms cast from concrete was popular throughout the eastern bloc.

After World War Two socialist Yugoslavia led by Josip Broz Tito set out to reconstruct a land destroyed by fighting. Residential blocks, hotels, civic centres and monuments all made of concrete shot up across the country. The architecture was supposed to show the power of a state between two worlds – Western democracy and the communist East, looking to forge its own path and create a socialist utopia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Garage doors are seen outside Block 23 in an apartment neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A security worker walks inside Hall 1 of the Belgrade Fair in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A staircase stands within The Great Hall inside The Palata Srbija building in Belgrade, Serbia. The Palata Srbija building hosted former world leaders. Each of the former Yugoslav republics had its own salon with a central room called the hall of Yugoslavia. “It is a shame to keep such a master piece away from the eyes of the public”, said Sandra Tesla, curator of the building.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Windows face out of the building, known as the “TV building”, on Block 28 neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Clinical Hospital Dubrava stands in Zagreb, Croatia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Karaburma Housing Tower, also known as the “Toblerone” building, stands in the Karaburma district in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

The Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija stands in Petrova Gora, Croatia. Examples of Yugoslav brutalism include the huge memorials commemorating the struggle against fascism, often placed in dramatic rural settings. Many of those pieces of art remain in disrepair, such as The Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

The Eastern City Gate apartment buildings complex stands in the Konjarnik neighbourhood in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A staircase is seen inside the Block 11, apartment neighbourhood in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Genex Tower, also known as The Western City gate, stands in Belgrade, Serbia. The building consists of two soaring pillars, connected by an aerial bridge. The tower is one of the most significant examples of brutalism, an architectural style popular in the 1950s and 1960s, based on crude, block-like forms cast from concrete. “Genex tower is among the most interesting sight. People see it on their way from the airport and it immediately draws their attention”, said Vojin Muncin, manager of the Yugotour sightseeing agency which guides tourists around the Serbian capital.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A chandelier hangs from the top of the Croatia saloon inside The Palata Srbija building in Belgrade, Serbia. The Palata Srbija building hosted former world leaders. Each of the former Yugoslav republics had its own salon with a central room called the hall of Yugoslavia. “It is a shame to keep such a master piece away from the eyes of the public”, said Sandra Tesla, curator of the building.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A formally used Yugoslav passenger aircraft sits in front of the Aeronautical Museum in Belgrade, Serbia.

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below

More Inspiring Stories

Landscape Designer Created A Secret Forest In The Very Heart Of London
Solar-Powered Cylindrical Treehouse In Mexico Is Made With Sustainable Bamboo
This Public Pavilion Covered In Plants Was Designed To Invite People To Sit Inside
2013 World Architecture Festival
Grand Canyon Skywalk
New York Artist Sculpts Sandcastles That Would Make M.C. Escher Proud
Amazing Photographs Documented Victorian Houses Moving In San Francisco In The 1970s
Just Before It Was Destroyed By Fire, These Amazing Photos Captured The Cliff House In The Early 1900s
These Tiny Bubble Domes Let You Sleep Under The Stars
Remains Of An Older More Advanced Civilization Has Been Found In Russia
This Bizarre Japanese Temple Looks Like A Fallen Intergalactic Starship
Sculptural Steel Labyrinth at a Former Coal Mine
The Tiny Tree House Sits Within A Forest In France
Architectural Covers By Przemysław Sobiecki
North Korea's Ryugyong Hotel: 'Worst Building in the History of Mankind' and Probably the Ugliest
This Ingenious Couple Built The House Of Their Dreams — And It’s Amazingly Small!
This UFO Spaceship McDonald’s Used to Exist in Alconbury, England in the 1990s
Freddy Mamani's New Andean Architecture Adds Colour to Bolivian City
Head in the Clouds by Studio Klimonski Chang Architects
New York-Based Design Studio LARS BÜRO Has Created The 'Cybunker', An Off-Grid Shelter To House The Recently Unveiled Tesla Cybertruck
Stunning Images Of The Seven Wonders Of The Ancient World Restored In Their Prime
Scottish National Portrait Gallery Ready for Public
A Closer Look Inside the Student Apartment in Hong Kong
This House Looks Normal But It's Actually Made Entirely Of Newspaper
30 Times People Came Across The Most Ridiculous Balconies
Futuristic Organic Cities By Luca Curci Architects
Russian Pharaoh Puts His Apartment to Sale
35 Entrances, 3708 Apartments: Welcome to the Russian Kowloon Walled City!
Maijishan Grottoes
Modern Home Features a Staircase Designed Specifically for Small Pets