Toward A Concrete Utopia: The Monumental Beauty Of Yugoslavia Brutalist Architecture


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Laundry hangs out to dry outside of Block 23 in an apartment neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia. Brutalism, an architectural style popular in the 1950s and 1960s, based on crude, block-like forms cast from concrete was popular throughout the eastern bloc.

After World War Two socialist Yugoslavia led by Josip Broz Tito set out to reconstruct a land destroyed by fighting. Residential blocks, hotels, civic centres and monuments all made of concrete shot up across the country. The architecture was supposed to show the power of a state between two worlds – Western democracy and the communist East, looking to forge its own path and create a socialist utopia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Garage doors are seen outside Block 23 in an apartment neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A security worker walks inside Hall 1 of the Belgrade Fair in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A staircase stands within The Great Hall inside The Palata Srbija building in Belgrade, Serbia. The Palata Srbija building hosted former world leaders. Each of the former Yugoslav republics had its own salon with a central room called the hall of Yugoslavia. “It is a shame to keep such a master piece away from the eyes of the public”, said Sandra Tesla, curator of the building.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Windows face out of the building, known as the “TV building”, on Block 28 neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Clinical Hospital Dubrava stands in Zagreb, Croatia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Karaburma Housing Tower, also known as the “Toblerone” building, stands in the Karaburma district in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

The Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija stands in Petrova Gora, Croatia. Examples of Yugoslav brutalism include the huge memorials commemorating the struggle against fascism, often placed in dramatic rural settings. Many of those pieces of art remain in disrepair, such as The Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

The Eastern City Gate apartment buildings complex stands in the Konjarnik neighbourhood in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A staircase is seen inside the Block 11, apartment neighbourhood in Belgrade, Serbia.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Genex Tower, also known as The Western City gate, stands in Belgrade, Serbia. The building consists of two soaring pillars, connected by an aerial bridge. The tower is one of the most significant examples of brutalism, an architectural style popular in the 1950s and 1960s, based on crude, block-like forms cast from concrete. “Genex tower is among the most interesting sight. People see it on their way from the airport and it immediately draws their attention”, said Vojin Muncin, manager of the Yugotour sightseeing agency which guides tourists around the Serbian capital.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A chandelier hangs from the top of the Croatia saloon inside The Palata Srbija building in Belgrade, Serbia. The Palata Srbija building hosted former world leaders. Each of the former Yugoslav republics had its own salon with a central room called the hall of Yugoslavia. “It is a shame to keep such a master piece away from the eyes of the public”, said Sandra Tesla, curator of the building.


Marko Djurica/Reuters

A formally used Yugoslav passenger aircraft sits in front of the Aeronautical Museum in Belgrade, Serbia.

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below

More Inspiring Stories:

Urbanization in Medellin, Colombia
Harbin Ice and Snow Festival 2012: Spectacular Sculptures Pierce China's Skies
The Coolest University Dorm that You Can Imagine
Prefab Modular Living Units From Slovenia By Coodo
Bloomin' Lovely
Paris Mayor’s Race Offers Chance to Reimagine City
Lovely House Built by a Russian Blacksmith
Surreal Architectural Collages By Beomsik Won
This Bizarre Japanese Temple Looks Like A Fallen Intergalactic Starship
Bizarre House Hangs Perilously Over a Cliff’s Edge in Australia
This Bookstore In Chinese City Of Suzhou Becomes A Wonderland
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Most Famous Buildings Get 3D Paper Model Treatment In New Book
PIXERS: Your Walls & Stuff
Meet The Solar Egg, A Giant Golden Sauna Built In Luossabacken, Sweden
Grasshopper’s Dream, A Cafe With Two Giant Grasshoppers At The Train Station In South Korea
Emergency Slide May Save Your Life
Surreal Sliding House Created By Artist Alex Chinneck
This Feline-shaped Kindergarten Is The Cat’s Meow
Glass House by Harumi Yukutake
This Incredible ’Time Capsule’ Home Hasn’t Changed At All For Over 72 Years
Toledo Metro Station by Oscar Tusquets Blanca
The 'Smallest House in Italy' Is Architecturally Stunning
American Radiator Building - The Most Beautiful Skyscraper Of Art Deco Era
Star Wars Millennium Falcon-Style Home In Australia
Weird Architecture - The Apartment Block With "Chicken Legs"
Why Did A Brazilian Millionaire Winch A Formula 1 Car Up The Side Of An Apartment Block?
Facebook's New Server Farm in Sweden
This Might Be The Coziest Bus Stop In Britain
Soviet Brutalist Architecture Photographed By Frederic Chaubin
"Straight Out Of Inception": Enthralling Optical Illusion Bookstore Will Draw You Into A World Of Fantasy