Toward A Concrete Utopia: The Monumental Beauty Of Yugoslavia Brutalist Architecture


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Laundry hangs out to dry outside of Block 23 in an apartment neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia. Brutalism, an architectural style popular in the 1950s and 1960s, based on crude, block-like forms cast from concrete was popular throughout the eastern bloc. Continue reading »

Brutalist Cityscapes Of Shanghai In Stunning Photo Works By Aaron Shao

Striking cityscapes by Aaron Shao, a gifted self-taught photographer, drone pilot, and urban explorer from Shanghai, China. Aaron focuses on urban and architecture photography. He explores his city to capture spectacular cityscapes and urban landscapes. Shao uses Sony a7R III camera and DJI Mavic 2 Pro drone. Continue reading »

Architecture And Fantasy In Brutalist France

Eric Tabuchi takes portraits of buildings, showing them in isolation so we can best wonder why, how and who made them? Place his images side by side and you construct ideas of what we are now. It’s diverse. You think you know what Eric’s native France looks like and then – bam! – Eric shows you the things those oh-so civilised French build to live in and around. It’s not all cobbles, je ne sais quoi and gargoyles. Continue reading »

The Radical And Visionary Modernist And Brutalist Architecture Of Macedonia


The Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (architect Boris Čipan, 1976).

Featuring the radical and visionary Modernist and Brutalist architecture of Skopje, by architects such as Kenzo Tange, Janko Konstantinov, Marko Mušič and many others, this two-sided bilingual guide includes a map, an introduction by Skopje-based experts, details of over forty buildings and structures, and original photography.

Modernist Skopje Map is edited by Ana Ivanovska Deskova, Vladimir Deskov, Jovan Ivanovski and Ljubica Slavkovic. Photography is by Vase Amanito. Continue reading »

Toward A Concrete Utopia: Brutalist Yugoslavian Architecture

A new exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art focuses on the period of intense construction in the former Yugoslavia between its break with the Soviet bloc in 1948 and the death of the country’s longtime leader Josip Broz Tito in 1980

Photographs by Valentin Jeck, commissioned by Moma, 2016.


Situated between the capitalist West and the socialist East, Yugoslavia’s postwar architects responded to contradictory demands and influences by developing an architecture both in line with and distinct from the design approaches seen elsewhere in Europe and beyond. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 at New York’s Museum of Modern Art from 15 July to 13 January. Monument to the Battle of the Sutjeska, Miodrag Živković, 1965–71, Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Continue reading »

Enigmatic And Brutalist Post-Communist Sculptures In The Balkans

Passionate about unusual abandoned places all around the world, photographer Jonk releases a second book called Spomeniks taking us in search of old statues in the Balkans erected in the 60s and 70s. Spomenik means monument or memorial, in the language of the former Yugoslavia. Continue reading »

Brutalist Breuer Building Owned By IKEA Could Become Hotel In Connecticut

IKEA is considering plans to transform a concrete structure by modernist architect Marcel Breuer in New Haven into a hotel, according to reports. Continue reading »

Soviet Brutalist Architecture Photographed By Frederic Chaubin

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When one thinks of something fascinating, Soviet brutalist architecture does not come to mind. However, Frédéric Chaubin’s remarkable photographs, published under the curious title “CCCP: Cosmic Communist Constructions Photographed”, can change that perspective of many. French photographer has traveled the former Soviet Union since 2003, capturing unusual sculptural buildings. Continue reading »

Brutalist Buildings Made From Lego Bricks

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With a penchant for Berlin architecture, German artist Arndt Schlaudraff creates brutalist buildings made out of white Lego bricks. Continue reading »

Neuno – A New Brutalist-Modern Tablet Stands!

Kassen introduses a new modern tablet stands. Using natural wood, hand-cut steel and Kassen’s troth-to-material philosophy, the Nenuo tablet stand is a warm, organic piece that will personalize – and humanize – your tablet computing experience! Click images to zoom. Continue reading »

Bublik – Circular Apartment Building In Moscow Is The Pinnacle Of Brutalism

During the socialist time eastern Europe was a home to many unusual ‘brutalist’ structures, Moscow especially. Communist authorities had to industrialize and expand the cities as soon as possible because of large influx of rural population in capital cities. Continue reading »

These Neon-Soaked Cityscapes Make South Africa Look Like Hong Kong

South African-based photographer Elsa Bleda specializes in cinematic shots of nocturnal cityscapes, shaped by brutalist architecture and lit up by an ever-present fluorescent glow. Continue reading »

Sony World Photography Awards 2017 Winners


© Alexander Vinogradov, Open Photographer of the Year, Open Competition, Portraits, 2017 Sony World Photography Awards

The 2017 Sony World Photography Award winners have officially been announced, revealing some of the most awe-inspiring and technically beautiful imagery from around the world. Over 227,000 entries were submitted. Continue reading »

Terrifying Russian Architecture Which Looks Better From Above

The main highlight of these unique Moscow buildings is their architectural forms. At usual angles they may look absolutely differently. But the creative idea of architects is disclosed in full measure only if you look at the buildings from above.

The Circle
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This is an experimental project of Russian architects Evgeny Stamo and Alexander Markelov. The residential house was built in 1972. The building was dedicated to the Olympic Games in 1980 and supposed to have 5 circles but after the second one the project was closed. Continue reading »

New York Artist Sculpts Sandcastles That Would Make M.C. Escher Proud

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When it comes to sandcastle construction, most people focus on the basics — a motte, a bailey, maybe a keep and a moat. New York artist Calvin Seibert, on the other hand, has bigger ideas. Continue reading »