Would You Swim In Rio De Janeiro’s Polluted Waters?

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A sofa floats in the polluted waters of Jacarepagua Lagoon, during a press tour in Rio de Janeiro, March 9, 2015. A press tour was organised by biologist Mario Moscatelli, to call attention to pollution on the waters of the lagoons which surround the Rio 2016 Olympic Park. (Photo by Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)
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“The Sea Isn’t Made for Fish” – Art Installation In Rio de Janeiro

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A doll forms part of a sculpture as part of an exhibit titled The Sea Isnt Made for Fish at Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply trash to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the citys Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo) Continue reading »

Tattoo Week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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A woman smiles as she gets a new tattoo during Rio Tattoo Week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, January 16, 2015. Tattoo artists from Brazil and around the world gathered for the annual three day convention. (Photo by Silvia Izquierdo/AP Photo)
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Soccer Match in Rio de Janeiro’s Slum


People take part in a soccer match held at the Tavares Bastos slum in Rio de Janeiro, May 18, 2014. The World Cup will be held in 12 cities in Brazil from June 12 till July 13. (Photo: Reuters) Continue reading »

Life Inside One of the Largest Favela in Rio de Janeiro

“A favela is the term for a slum in Brazil, most often within urban areas. The first favelas appeared in the late 19th century and were built by soldiers who had nowhere to live. Some of the first settlements were called bairros africanos (African neighbourhoods). This was the place where former slaves with no land ownership and no options for work lived. Over the years, many former black slaves moved in.

Even before the first favela came into being, poor citizens were pushed away from the city and forced to live in the far suburbs. However, most modern favelas appeared in the 1970s due to rural exodus, when many people left rural areas of Brazil and moved to cities. Unable to find a place to live, many people ended up in a favela. Census data released in December 2011 by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) shows that in 2010, about 6 percent of the population lived in slums in Brazil. This means that 11.4 million of the 190 million people that lived in the country resided in areas of irregular occupation definable by lack of public services or urbanization, referred to by the IBGE as “subnormal agglomerations”. – Wikipedia


Residents (R to L) Luiza, Janubie, Leiticia and Lucas sit beneath an overpass near their houses in an impoverished area in the unpacified Complexo da Mare slum complex, one of the largest “favela” complexes in Rio de Janeiro. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Animal Carnival in Rio de Janeiro


The animal carnival parade at Copacabana beach in Brazil rivals its human counterpart for colour. Photograph: Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images, Silvia Izquierdo/AP. Continue reading »

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