Rescue ‘Fortress’ In Tanzania Protects Albinos From Human Hunters

The rescue centres in Tanzania protect albino people from the vicious hunters who sell their body parts to witch doctors. Photojournalist Ana Palacios, 43, visited the centre in Tanzania three times between 2012 and 2016 to find out more about the plight of albino people. Persecution of albinism is rooted in the belief that the body parts can transmit magical powers, however, they are also ostracised by those who believe that they are cursed and bring bad luck. The Tanzanian government has been forced to set up special centres to protect people with albinism from harm.

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The women who flee to the centre with their albino children also act as guardians for the other albino children who have been abandoned at the centre in Kabanga Refuge Centre, Tanzania, 2012. (Photo by Ana Palacios/Barcroft Images) Continue reading »

Extremely Rare White Giraffe With Ginger Mane Spotted In Tanzania

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Omo the giraffe is fifteen months old. She has survived her first year despite being born with leucism – a condition which means only some of her skin cells can make pigment, which gives her almost white skin. She was photographed by Dr Derek Lee, founder and scientist at the Wild Nature Institute, whilst she was roaming the Tarangire National Park, in Tanzania. Continue reading »

Hunted in Tanzania, Saved in Philadephia: Young Albino Kids Rescued from the Albino Hunters

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Persecution of people with albinism (sometimes abbreviated PWA) may occur for different reasons. One is based on the belief that certain body parts of albinistic people can transmit magical powers. Such superstition is present especially in some parts of the African Great Lakes region, it has been promulgated and exploited by witch doctors and others who use such body parts as ingredients in rituals, concoctions and potions with the claim that their magic will bring prosperity to the user (“muti” or medicine murder). As a result, people with albinism have been persecuted, killed and dismembered, and graves of albinos dug up and desecrated. At the same time, people with albinism have also been ostracised and even killed for exactly the opposite reason, because they are presumed to be cursed and bring bad luck. The persecutions of people with albinism take place mostly in Black African communities, especially among East Africans. Continue reading »