Mike Rea’s Meticulously Crafted Wooden Sculptures Are A Film Nerd’s Heaven

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Chicago artist Mike Rea builds hyper-realistic wooden replicas of objects that have a connection to the culture of a stereotypical heterosexual male. His sculptures are either props from science fiction cinema, or personal memories – made primarily from wood, burlap and Styrofoam. Rea builds things like jail cells, video cameras used for filming pornography, Anaconda snakes, pick axes, robots, strange bits of machinery, Scuba diving tanks, and amplifiers. All are meticulously crafted and are rooted in pop culture. Rea is a self confessed film geek, watching up to 3 films a day and draws a lot of inspiration from the ‘swagger’ and macho attitudes in films like Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof. Continue reading »

Detailed Animal Portraits Meticulously Painted Onto Delicate Feathers

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Using feathers of wild turkeys and macaws as her canvas, Krystle Missildine paints intricate acrylic portraits of animals, ranging from small birds to big cats and everything in between. The texture of the feathers naturally adds a wispy visual effect to the painted animal’s fur, producing a strikingly realistic image. The gifted artist has made a career out of pet portraiture—including ones on custom-made ornaments—but only recently decided to venture into the art of painting on feathers, using a molted feather from her Lutino Cockatiel as her very first quill canvas. Continue reading »

Artist Meticulously Crochets Wire To Create Anatomically Correct Heart

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In her sculpture work, Anne Mondro has created a captivating metaphor for the close-knit relationships between medical patients and their caregivers. The artist uses a crochet hook and tinned copper wire to construct realistic 3D models of the heart, representing the human pulse—both literal and physical—within the healthcare system. Continue reading »

Incredibly Detailed Miniaturized Rooms Meticulously Reconstruct Actual Film Sets

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At first glance, these elaborate rooms appear as normal, everyday places. Once you look closer, however, you’ll see that a human hand easily dwarfs the architecture and everything is on a minuscule scale. They’re part of the Musée Miniature et Cinéma in Lyon, France, a five-story museum that contains over 100 hyperreal miniature film sets. The incredible attention to detail, including subtle lighting arrangements and replication of old textures, is why we’re mislead into thinking that each set is life-size.
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