Budweiser Adapts Its Sexist Ads From The 50s And 60s To 2019

In honor of the International Women’s Day, Budweiser, in collaboration with VaynerMedia, decided to revisit some of their some of their advertisements from the past era, that had some rather sexist remarks. The ads implied that anything women did was supposed to please men, with little attention to themselves. However, thanks to the efforts of feminists everywhere, that is no longer the case and women are free to be themselves without looking for male approval – and Budweiser decided to showcase just that. Continue reading »

“My Dead Pony”: Stunning Dismounted Collages By Raphael Vicenzi

Raphael Vicenzi is an illustrator and artist from Brussels, Belgium. A self-proclaimed ’graphic destroyer’ who explores ’creative misdirection’, working under the pseudonym Mydeadpony, Vicenzi is a fruitful designer who turns his peculiar ideas into crazy collages.

Most of his graphics contain a female character in combination with different patterns, colors, graffiti, clothing items, print motifs, and other elements that stylize the scene. Continue reading »

“Far Beyond The Immobile Point”: A Journey Through The Dismal World With Michal Karcz

Michal Karcz (previously) is a digital photographer and artist situated in Warsaw, Poland. All of his life, Karcz was involved with art, painting and other visual arts.

After having left painting – his biggest passion – he devoted his time to digital photography and painting, and so replaced one passion with another. As he contemplates, “digital photography and software gave [him] the opportunity to generate unique realities that were impossible to be created with ordinary darkroom techniques. Most of [his] work is like a journey to the places which do not exist. Places from [his] dreams, desire, imagination, and fears.” Continue reading »

“The Womb Beyond The World”: Dark Illustrations By Mexican Artist Tavo Santiago

Tavo Santiago is a freelance designer situated in Orizaba. Mexico. Even though he is specialized in digital art, his central works are character illustrations dark in nature. The main theme of his illustrations is death, usually on playing cards. Skeletons, wounds, swords and knives, magic and the spiritual, these are all things you can see on his dark digitalized drawings – both in color and nature. Continue reading »

“Children Of The Damned”: The Superb Artworks Of Ástor Alexander In Classic Sci-Fi And Noir

Imagine a combination of low-budget spaghetti westerns and Pixar cartoons, such as Toy Story. What world would it be set in and what stories would we be able to see? In fact, such a story has been at the center of attention of an American illustrator, Ástor Alexander. Continue reading »

Breathtaking Underwater Photography By André Musgrove

Breathtaking underwater shots by André Musgrove, a multi-talented photographer, filmmaker, freediver, and scuba diving instructor from the little island of Nassau, Bahamas. André focuses mainly on the ocean and underwater photography. His passion for freediving, scuba diving, and spearfishing photography allow him to live a life consumed by the ocean and he wouldn’t have it any other way. Continue reading »

Snow In NYC: Photos Of The Winter Wonderland By Joseph O. Holmes

Joseph O. Holmes’s photographs have hung in solo and group shows around the world. “The Booth” was a featured solo exhibition in Toronto’s CONTACT photography festival, following its four-month run at New York City’s Museum of the Moving Image. Continue reading »

“Learning To Fly”: Gorgeous Vintage Photos Of Early NASA Facilities

From the wind tunnels the made commercial aviation possible to the analog machines that preceded the computer, a visual history of the spirit of innovation presently unworthy of the government’s dollar.

Among the great joys of spending countless hours rummaging through archives is the occasional serendipitous discovery of something absolutely wonderful: Case in point, these gorgeous photographs of vintage NASA (and NASA predecessor NACA) facilities.

Sperry M-1 Messenger

A Langley researcher ponders the future, in mid-1927, of the Sperry M-1 Messenger, the first full-scale airplane tested in the Propeller Research Tunnel. Standing in the entrance cone of the tunnel is Elton W. Miller, Max M. Munk’s successor as chief of aerodynamics. Miller was one of the designers of the Propeller Research Tunnel. Continue reading »

The Albert Clock Wants Your Complete Attention And Your Math Skills

Unlike other clocks that require a simple glance and a split-second to tell the time, the Albert Clock wants your focused and undivided attention. It also wants to sharpen your math skills, whether you like it or not. This digital wall clock, created by designer Axel Schindlbeck for MNTNT, keeps the brain waves active by presenting you with mathematical equations that you’d have to solve to know what time it is. Goodbye, spoon-feeding! Continue reading »

Artist Captures Beautiful Photos Of Flowers In Bloomy Neon

According to Claire Boscher: “These images are part of photographic research I did on the theme of colourful flowers for a collaboration with Huawei for wallpapers design. This project allowed me to continu my artistic research to find new aesthetic designs and colour palettes. Colourful lights are made with coloured filter.” Continue reading »

When Modern Love Meets Classic Comic Books

Peter Nidzgorski is the artist provocateur behind the site This isn’t Happiness. Under the name Peteski, he blogs about art, photography, design, and disappointment. One of the big attractions of his site is his clever manipulation of images like these altered panels from classic love story comic books. Continue reading »

The Meditative Beauty Of Nighttime In Dreamy Photographs By Neil Kryszak

Neil Kryszak is a photographer from New York, currently based in Los Angeles, CA working with fine art, commercial & fashion photography. Continue reading »

Candid Vintage Photographs That Show German Soldiers Using Latrines During World War I

Soldiers lived in the trenches when fighting during World War I, it was muddy, noisy and pretty basic. They didn’t have toilets so it was probably a bit stinky too.

The latrines was the name given to trench toilets. They were usually pits, 4 ft. to 5 ft. deep, dug at the end of a short sap. Each company had two sanitary personnel whose job it was to keep the latrines in good condition. In many units, officers gave out sanitary duty as a punishment for breaking army regulations. Before a change-over in the trenches, the out-going unit was supposed to fill in its latrines and dig a new one for the new arrivals. Continue reading »

“Terminal City”: Extraordinary Photos Of Vancouver 1972-1982


Ovaltine Cafe

From 1972 to 1982, Greg Girard photographed Vancouver, Canada, his home town. Before Expo 86, when the money moved in, Vancouver was a working-class port city of cheap hotels, greasy diners and neon. Continue reading »

Designer Conceived A Bottle That Indicates For Each Town Where To Find A Drinking Water

Despite the historical presence of public water fountains in most of the large cities of the world, city inhabitants still hesitate to drink that “street water” and prefer to buy a plastic bottle, which is pollutive. Continue reading »