This Bolivian Student Built The Wall-E Robot Using Materials He Obtained From A Local Rubbish Dump

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David Mercado/Reuters

Bolivian student Esteban Quispe holds a replica of the Wall-E character in Patacamaya, south of La Paz. Quispe built the Wall-E robot using materials he obtained from a rubbish dump in the town located in the Andean highland region. He hopes to mechanize agriculture in Patacamaya by making use of robots that operate on solar energy, Quispe told Reuters.
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Photographer Visited Bolivia’s Graveyard Of Trains

Photographer Visited Bolivia's Graveyard Of Trains
David Mercado/Reuters

It’s a cemetery for trains, for locomotives (previously). And it’s so big that it looks as though all of the trains in South America were moved to Uyuni, Bolivia, to chug their last chug. Continue reading »

Spectacular Photos Of The Lost Train Graveyard In Bolivia

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Chris Staring / Rex Features / Shutterstock

Chris Staring photographs a mysterious train graveyard in the heart of southern Bolivia, where the skeletons of British steam locomotives and rail cars rust away on the edge of the world’s largest salt flats. More than 100 rail cars and locomotives can be found in different states of decay in the train graveyard. Continue reading »

The Alasitas Fair in Bolivia

The Alasitas fair is an annual month-long cultural event starting on January 24th in La Paz, Bolivia. It honours Ekeko, the Aymara god of abundance, and is noted for the giving of miniature items. The indigenous Aymara people observed an event called Chhalasita in the pre-Columbian era, when people prayed for good crops and exchanged basic goods. Over time, it evolved to accommodate elements of Catholicism and Western acquisitiveness. Its name is the Aymara word for “buy me”. The Alasitas festival is held annually for the Ekeko. It sprawls along many streets and parks in central La Paz and smaller events are held in many neighborhoods around the city. People attend the event from all over the city and even travel from other cities inside Bolivia to buy miniature versions of goods they would like to give to somebody else. These goods can be blessed by any one of the men and (less frequently) women acting as shaman. It is believed that if somebody gives a miniature version, the recipient will get the real object in the course of the following year. Examples of goods that can be bought are household items, food, computers, construction materials, cell phones, houses, cars, university diplomas and even figures of domestic workers (whom the recipient might hope to employ).

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A woman sells statues of the Ekeko, god of fortune, at the traditional “Alasitas” fair in La Paz January 24, 2015. During the fair, Bolivians buy miniature versions of goods like cars, money and houses they would like to own in real life during the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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Witches Market in Bolivia

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Aymara witchdoctor Ricardo Quispe, also called “Lord of the Lake”, throws coca leaves during a ritual to predict the future, at the witches market of El Alto, on the outskirts of La Paz, December 31, 2014. Dozens of witch doctors tend to a warren of stalls in El Alto, making offerings to give thanks, to promise luck at work or in love, or to call up spirits and banish curses at the end of the year. (Photo by David Mercado/Reuters)
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