All posts by dmitry

This Woman And Her Cat Have Been On The Most Gorgeous Sailboat Adventure Since 2006

Liz Clark, a self-proclaimed “she-pirate,” and her cat Amelia have been sailing around the world in an 11-by-40-foot boat since 2006. Together, they’ve traveled the coasts of Mexico and Central America and parts of the South Pacific. According to Clark’s website, this journey “isn’t just a surf trip — it’s a lifestyle, passion, and search for better ways for humanity to inhabit our shared planet.” Continue »

Artist Playfully Reimagines Classic Art Paintings As LEGO People

You’ve seen LEGO minifigurines, those yellow humans that inhabit every imaginable LEGO universe. But what would happen if they magically appeared in some of the world’s most famous paintings? Italian artist Stefano Bolcato fulfills this fantasy with his clever series People. Continue »

Amazing Rock Art Pieces By Stefano Furlani

Born and raised in Fano, Italy, Stefano Furlani is accustomed to life lived along the sea and its sandy, rocky shores. Much time was spent exploring the stones of this shore with his son, creating beautiful designs. Eventually, Furlani decided to preserve these rocky art pieces on canvas. The results are truly amazing. Continue »

Moscow vs New York: Visual Comparison Of Two Big Cities 45 Years Ago

1969, Soviet Moscow and New York City. Two big totally different cities, two cultures, two nations. We have found some photos of the old cities and tried to compare them. Just have a look at pictures below and find out what came out of it.

Moscow on the left; New York City on the right. Continue »

This Tiny, Painted Door At The Base Of A Tree Stump Has Been A Fixture Of The Harvard University Campus For Decades

Pooh’s house is a tiny, painted door at the base of a tree stump that has been a fixture of the Harvard University campus for decades, though it has a complicated history that’s not always sunny. It’s a little piece of Harvard that’s worth the visit—if you can bend down far enough to see it properly. Continue »

Kurdish Dandies Start Iraq’s First Fashion Club

It’s not just about bringing fashion to Iraq. For these Kurdish peacocks it’s also about promoting a positive image of their homeland to the world. In early February 2016, a group of young men gathered in the ancient citadel at the heart of Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s autonomous Kurdistan Region. It was deep into the second winter of the Kurds’ war against the Islamic State and the region was mired in economic crisis. As a result, restoration work on the ancient UNESCO-listed site — said to be one of the oldest continuously inhabited places in the world — had ground to a halt, leaving the citadel with the air of an abandoned film set. Continue »

6-Month-Old Giant Panda Twins Debut At The Panda House Of Chongqing Zoo


Jason Lee/Reuters

6-month-old giant panda twins play at the panda house of Chongqing Zoo in Chongqing, China. The giant panda boy and girl twins were born in July last year, and made their debut on Sunday in Chongqing Zoo. Continue »

Photographer Weronika Gęsicka Takes Corny American Photography And Manipulates It Into Something Surreal And Uncomfortable

In Weronika Gęsicka’s unsettling images, American archive photography gets distorted into scenes that are both nightmarish yet somehow entirely plausible. Gęsicka is a guest artist at the Circulations festival for young European photographers, Paris, until 5 March. Continue »

Can Photographs Change The World? Somalia Tragedy Through The Lens Of Jean-Claude Coutausse

Photographs have the capacity to transcend politics, in the times of war, natural disasters and perpetrated crimes. The written and verbal perspectives of media figures and scholars can at times diminish the causalties of victims. One of the below photographs by Jean-Claude Coutausse displays Somali men running the opposite way a United Nations convoy is driving towards and the other photograph depicts a Somali boy protesting “against the presence of foreign troops” with two bloody corpses and a crowd dissembling behind him. As a native of Somalia and as an American, these two photographs represent volumes of irony in politics where causalities can not be ignored. Thus as Jonathan Klein has stated “images have the impact of touching people.”

North Kenya, Liboi. A young Somali refugee crosses a field filled with marabous storks in July 1992:

Although the above photos have changed the world, Operation Restore Hope has traces of obscurity from our U.S. nation’s standpoint as well as my native Somalia. Censorship is a great contributor to this obscurity as Ted Rall put it “Dead and wounded Afghans, Iraqis, Pakistanis, Somalis, Yemenis and Libyans have been expunged from American popular culture as well. Other factors are the 6 corporations which control 90% of the media in America” which “constrict the flow of information”
as Professor Nordell stated. Continue »

Watch Inside Obama’s New Home

President Obama and his family plan to move to a mansion in the upscale Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, a mere two miles from the White House, when he leaves office in January, according to people familiar with his plans. Continue »

Magical Drawings Put Women In Conversation With Their Inner Demons

The devil and femininity have long been entangled. From Eve’s creation of original sin to The Devil Wears Prada, women portrayed as satan are represented as the downfall of the good man. But one artist is reclaiming the devil for women and their personal demons.

Got 2 Get Through This

In Polly Nor’s whimsical illustrated world, woman is a devil unto herself. She sheds her human skin and drinks a beer, horns out and cigarette in mouth. Her demons brush her hair in the bathtub. They hug and dream and fall asleep in pink sheets. Continue »

Photographer Balint Alovits Explores The Beauty Of Spiral Staircases In Budapest

Balint Alovits was born in Budapest in 1987. Graduated from Metropolitan University in Budapest with a Bachelor’s degree in photography in 2014. His photographic work is simple, precise and airy and most of his projects are based on spatiality. Continue »

Artist Shepard Fairey Adapts Obama’s Hope Poster For Trump Inauguration

Shepard Fairey, whose iconic posters supporting Barack Obama’s 2008 election won him Design of the Year, has a new offering for this Friday’s presidential inauguration. The American graphic designer has applied the same posterised style and palette of red, beige and blue of the Hope imagery to three new designs, created for nonprofit organisation the Amplifier Foundation. Continue »

Architects Adds Treetop Cabin With Stargazing Net To Sweden’s Treehotel

Architecture firm Snøhetta has completed a treetop cabin for the Treehotel in northern Sweden, featuring charred-timber cladding and a suspended net for observing the Northern Lights. Set 10 metres above the forest floor in the crown of a tall pine tree and supported by 12 columns, The 7th Room provides views out over Swedish Lapland, to the Lule River and of the aurora borealis. Continue »

Truthful Images That Show Why Holocaust Memorial Selfies Are So Disrespectful

We are a world of selfie takers and they have invaded every part of life. But is there ever a time when they shouldn’t be taken? At a Holocaust memorial, for example. That’s the view of Israeli satirist and author Shahak Shapira who has created a website to show why such selfies are so distasteful. He’s taken people’s selfies from instagram, Tinder, Grindr and Facebook and used them to create a blend to show how ridiculous the selfies would look if taken in the aftermath of the death camps. Continue »