When Dize Does Matter – Bestiarum Vocabulum: Last Of The Earth’s Giants

Patrick Aryee is a biologist. After studying Cancer Biology at the University of Bristol, Patrick decided to pursue a career in wildlife filmmaking and was an integral crew member for a number of BBC productions. Now, Patrick Aryee’s gets up close and personal with some of the world’s biggest creatures in his new three-part series. Episode one airs on Sky1, Wednesday 13 June, 9pm.


The Amphimachairodus, an early member of the cat family, was 1.3m in length and weighed an estimated 490kg. (Photo by Sky TV/The Guardian) Continue reading »

An Architect Who Illustrates The Secret Life Of Giants In The Streets Of Turkish Cities

According to an artist Hakan Keleş: “I am an architect, academician and illustrator living in Turkey. I started to draw big characters on street photos I took with my smartphone, named “Lilliputs series”. The name comes from the novel “Gulliver’s Travels”, the city of dwarfs. Here, we, real people, become dwarfs. Some of them are kind of monsters, some of them are influenced from real people and the others are a bit humorous. They are from different urban areas I visited in Turkey.” Continue reading »

Gentle Giants Studio Has Designed A Collection Of Candles Intended To Raise Awareness Of The Global Warming

The collection of candles, created for BOZU Italian Design Workshop, is named Bergy Bit, which is the scientific term for a small iceberg “bit” that has broken free from a larger iceberg. And the candles melt and change form as they burn, reminding you that icebergs do the same. Continue reading »

Six Large Wood Giants Are Now Hiding Out In A Forest Near Copenhagen

Artist Thomas Dambo has brought to life a new project: “The 6 Forgotten Giants.” The project consists of six large hidden sculptures, made from various types of recycled wood, with the help of local volunteers in Copenhagen. The recycled wood used for the breathtaking giants varies from scrap wood, to cut offs from old trees, to buildings that have been torn down. Continue reading »

Tanks – The Fallen Giants Of The World War I

A British tank which has crashed into a tree, near Cambrai, Franc, 1917:

Getty Images

The development of tanks in World War I was a response to the stalemate that had developed on the Western Front. Although vehicles that incorporated the basic principles of the tank (armour, firepower, and all-terrain mobility) had been projected in the decade or so before the War, it was the heavy casualties sustained in the first few months of hostilities that stimulated development. Research took place in both Great Britain and France, with Germany only belatedly following the Allies’ lead. Continue reading »

The Land Of Giants By Choi + Shine Architects

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Power to the people! Giant transmission tower people that is… We can all agree that transmission towers (that’s an electricity pylon or ironman for you European and Aussie folk) are very necessary yet completely unsightly. These suspension towers dot our landscapes, typically soaring 15-55 meters (49 – 180 ft) high. Continue reading »

Death of a Giants


A marine rescue worker photographs a sperm whale that washed up on Portobello beach in Edinburgh, Scotland, Saturday, January 11, 2014. Police in Scotland and a Scottish Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, SSPCA, team were called to Portobello beach near the Rockville hotel in Joppa, Edinburgh, at around 7.30 am Saturday. A spokeswoman said the animal is dead and arrangements are being made with Edinburgh City Council to remove it from the water. (Photo by Andrew Milligan/AP Photo/PA Wire) Continue reading »

Photo of the Day: Smart Giants

Nepalese mahouts walk their elephants through the Rapti River from Chitwan National Park in Sauraha, Chitwan. An elephant festival begins today where elephants take part in races, soccer, a beauty pageant and other activities to attract tourists. (Niranjan Shrestha/Associated Press) Click image to zoom.

Underwater Giants: The Magnificent Manta Rays of the Maldives

Swooping gracefully through the water like giant bats, these huge manta rays gather to feed on microscopic plankton. These amazing pictures were taken by British photographer Warren Baverstock, who spent nine days on the Maldives to capture these beautiful creatures. Up to 200 mantas gather in Hanifaru Bay, which is just the size of a football pitch, to feed and be cleaned of parasites by smaller fish.

Manta rays are the world’s largest ray and have the biggest brain to body weight ratio of their cousins the skates and sharks. They feed on plankton and fish larvae either on the ocean floor or in open water. They filter their food from the water passing through their gills as they swim. Mantas frequently visit cleaning stations where small fish such as wrasse, remora, and angelfish swim in their gills. (Time) Continue reading »