Japanese Photographer Spends His Life Shooting Women’s Thighs

Introducing Yuria, a mysterious Japanese photographer who makes a living by taking photos of women’s thighs (“futomomo” in Japanese) – over 30,000 photos to be precise. Yuria is a self-proclamed “Futomomo Artist“. Continue reading »

Innovative Umbrella That Keeps Your Camera Dry When Shooting In The Rain

Nubrella is a hands-free, non-invertible umbrella and weather protector, conveniently worn backpack-style. After putting on the 3-pound Nubrella like a backpack, the canopy flips over your head and locks in place. Built using waterproof nylon, aluminum rods, and glass-filled plastic, the canopy is designed to withstand 40mph winds without flipping inside out. Continue reading »

These Photos Were Made By Spinning The Camera While Shooting

Natural Rotations is a photo series by Surrey, England-based photographer Simon Painter. Each of the images was created by spinning the camera while an exposure is in progress. Continue reading »

Shooting For New “Bavarian And Austrian Farmer Wives” Calendar

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AFP / Christof Stache

Six Bavarian and Austrian farmers wives have swapped their overalls for sexy sportswear for a new raunchy calendar that will be published in autumn 2017. Models Caroline, Sofia, Elena, Viktoria, Daniela and Veronika were all happy to get mucky at a farm in Apfeldorf, southern Germany, and sport gym kit for the ‘crossfit on the farm’ theme. Continue reading »

Japan’s First Female Photojournalist is Still Shooting at the Age of 101

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At 101 years old, renowned Japanese photographer Tsuneko Sasamoto continues to express her artistic voice and capture stunning images. Considered to be her country’s first photojournalist at the age of 25, Sasamoto has been documenting history for over 70 years, including pre- and post-war Japan. Her photographs highlighted the country’s dramatic shift from a totalitarian regime to an economic superpower, and the social implications that arose from it. Continue reading »

“I am Charlie”: A World’s Tribute to Paris Shooting Victims

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A woman holds a placard that reads, “I am Charlie”, during a vigil to pay tribute to the victims of a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, at Trafalgar Square in London January 7, 2015. (Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters)
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Shooting an Elephant

Wildlife photographer Paul Souders managed to write off a handful of expensive cameras while taking these close-ups of bull African elephants drinking at a water hole in the Nxai Pan National Park, Botswana. In order to get the shots he used a remote controlled device mounted to the camera body. (Paul Souders / Barcroft Media) Continue reading »

Photo of the Day: Shooting Arenas in Woolwich, London

A steward stands outside one of the shooting arenas during the Olympic Shooting test event and World Cup at the Royal Artillery Barracks in Woolwich, London. (Matt Dunham/Associated Press) Click image to zoom.

Shooting Under the Antarctic Ice

For “Frozen Planet” director Chadden Hunter and cameraman Didier Noiret, the challenges of photographing emperor penguins rocketing through ice holes from the water below at high speeds were significant, but shooting them underwater was even more daunting. In order to show the penguins with the jet stream of bubbles behind them, they had to dive unthethered (a rope could get tangled with the camera) and film with a slow motion camera that they had never used underwater before.

The documentary “Frozen Planet” will premiere in the U.S. on Discovery Channel on March 18 at 8 p.m., and the companion book is available January 2012 from Firefly Books. All images courtesy Firefly Books/BBC Earth.

Didier Noiret in action under water, where the massive camera is weightless, allowing him to track the emperors. Those that have swum up from the depths are circling around the exit point, waiting for their heart rates to return to normal. They then jet-propel themselves upwards, leaving a rocket trail of bubbles in their wake as all the air is forced out of their feathers. With no limbs to pull themselves onto the ice, this is the only way to exit. But it means they can’t see what’s on the surface, and beak-breaking collisions with ice blocks can happen. Continue reading »