Stunning Winning Photos Of Wellcome Photography Prize 2021

Here are the winners of “Wellcome Photography Prize 2021”. Our two winners for 2021 are ‘Untangling’, Jameisha Prescod’s picture of herself knitting to block out her depression during lockdown, and ‘Trans Woman: Between Colour and Voice’, Yoppy Pieter’s series chronicling how the Covid-19 pandemic has made life harder for trans women in Indonesia.

The two winning entries were chosen by a diverse panel of judges from more than 10,000 images submitted from all over the world. Entries spanned six categories: Managing Mental Health series and single image, Fighting Infections series and single image, and Health in a Heating World series and single image.

The other category winners show volunteers disinfecting a theatre near the origin of the first Covid-19 outbreak, a man struggling to survive in the aftermath of a cyclone, a fantasy of depression as a sinister, ever-present fish, and a community whose fertile wetlands have turned to desert.

Managing Mental Health (single image): Untangling by Jameisha Prescod

“The isolation of lockdown exacerbated London film maker Jameisha Prescod’s depression, as she spent most of her time in the concentrated chaos of this room. “It’s where I work a full-time job, eat, sleep, catch up with friends and most importantly cry.” Before long, she felt like she was “drowning in the clutter”. For escape, she turned to knitting, which helps to soothe her mind. It may not be a cure, but it does at least put “everything else on pause” for a while.” Continue reading »

Wellcome Photography Prize 2021 Shortlist

Wellcome Photography Prize has announced its 2021 shortlist. Now in its third year, the 2021 prize covers three areas of interest which reflect Wellcome’s three worldwide health challenge areas – mental health, global heating and infectious disease.

The shortlist comprises 90 photos by 31 professional, amateur and student photographers, from across the world. Covering topics from the impact of Covid-19 on transgender women in Jakarta, to rising temperatures in the Arctic Ocean, to addiction and the process of recovery, the prize aims to tell provocative visual stories and challenge preconceptions of these urgent health issues of our time.


Managing Mental Health (single image). Disconnected by Kate Rosewell. “Experiences of dissociation involve feeling separated from yourself, like watching your life as if it were a film. Distanced self-portraits such as this one capture a sense of that for Kate Rosewell, and help her to make sense of what’s in her mind. Dissociation can be a way of deflecting intense trauma, but it can also occur in less extreme situations, not least the isolation of lockdown, which in another way has separated so many of us from reality”. (Photo by Kate Rosewell/Wellcome Photography Prize 2021) Continue reading »

Wellcome Image Awards 2017

The 2017 Wellcome Image Awards will take place on 15 March at the Wellcome Trust. The winning images will go on display in science centres and public galleries around the world from 16 March 2017. Images are judged on quality, technique, visual impact, and their ability to communicate and engage.


Cat skin and blood supply. Whiskers, unlike normal hair, are touch receptors, each containing a sensory organ called a proprioceptor. Scientists injected blood vessels with a red dye called carmine dye (here appearing black) in order to visualise the capillaries in the tissue, a newly developed technique at the time. The picture is a composite made up of 44 individual images which were stitched together. Here, fine hairs (yellow), thicker whisker (yellow) and blood vessels (black) are all visible. (Photo by David Linstead/Wellcome Images) Continue reading »

Albert Einstein’s Brain on Display at London Wellcome Exhibition

Albert Einstein’s brain will go on display for the first time at an exhibition in London. The Wellcome Collection in London will display part of the scientist’s brain alongside that of Charles Babbage and two murderers William Burke and Edward Rulloff at the Mind as Matter exhibition. After his death in 1955, Einstein’s brain was divided into sections. Two sections will be featured at the Wellcome display.

The exhibition also features a 5,000-year-old skull with holes drilled through it, which shows how long humans have been performing brain surgery. Continue reading »