Toward A Concrete Utopia: The Monumental Beauty Of Yugoslavia Brutalist Architecture


Marko Djurica/Reuters

Laundry hangs out to dry outside of Block 23 in an apartment neighbourhood in New Belgrade, Serbia. Brutalism, an architectural style popular in the 1950s and 1960s, based on crude, block-like forms cast from concrete was popular throughout the eastern bloc. Continue reading »

Artist Redesigned Famous Yugoslavian Posters To Bring Back Good Memories

Graphic designer Zoran Cardula from Macedonia, Skopje, in his own way paid tribute to the Yugoslav design, and some of the most popular brands and visuals from the time of the former state. Continue reading »

Vintage Album Covers From Yugoslavia Are Amazingly Awkward

Music was a great source of unity for the Yugoslavs, with people enjoying genres from folk to disco and heavy metal performed by artists from a variety of ethnic and religious backgrounds. Serbs, Croats, Slovenes, Macedonians, Bosnians and Montenegrins shared the stage to create beautiful music, alongside soulful Roma and Albanian artists who brought even more exotic and unique sounds. Continue reading »

Toward A Concrete Utopia: Brutalist Yugoslavian Architecture

A new exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art focuses on the period of intense construction in the former Yugoslavia between its break with the Soviet bloc in 1948 and the death of the country’s longtime leader Josip Broz Tito in 1980

Photographs by Valentin Jeck, commissioned by Moma, 2016.


Situated between the capitalist West and the socialist East, Yugoslavia’s postwar architects responded to contradictory demands and influences by developing an architecture both in line with and distinct from the design approaches seen elsewhere in Europe and beyond. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 at New York’s Museum of Modern Art from 15 July to 13 January. Monument to the Battle of the Sutjeska, Miodrag Živković, 1965–71, Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Continue reading »

Fantastic Old Photos Of Yugoslavia From The 1920s, When People Were Nicer

In the mid-1920s the prominent German photographer Kurt Hielscher was invited by the government in Belgrade to travel to Yugoslavia and create a book with images of the state, founded only a few years earlier. Kurt Hielscher had already published similar and very successful books about Italy, Spain and Germany, so he took up the invitation with enthusiasm. Continue reading »