Sushi Chef Yujia Hu Creates Edible Sneaker ‘Shoe-Shi’

We’ve seen birthday cakes disguised as favorite Air Jordan retros and collaborations paying tribute to particular cities’ favorite cuisine, but we’ve never seen something quite like this. Milan-based sushi chef Yujia Hu has taken his love of sneaker culture to a new level, creating bite-sized arrangements of fresh fish in the form of his favorite must-have models of the moment. From the Supreme x Nike Air More Uptempo to the Air Jordan 1, he’s created an eclectic range of sneakers as art with Swoosh branding made from black strands of seaweed. Continue reading »

Edible Art By Sandra Van Den Broek

1

Sandra van den Broek from Netherlands creates the cutest character bento for her children’s. She’ll start by sketching the meal and prepares it with scissors, knives and toothpicks. Although you wouldn’t say, it usually takes Sandra only one hour to make a meal. She likes to make something practical, something for everyone to be able to follow. And if you look closely, you can see that it wouldn’t be too hard to make these bentos yourself. Continue reading »

Artist Creates Edible Replica Of A House From Tim Burton’s Newest Movie

1

Los Angeles-based artist Christine McConnell (previously here and here) created this astounding replica and she made it by using gingerbread. The gingerbread house is supposed to be a replica of a house from Tim Burton’s newest movie “Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children.” Not only does it look cool, but it’s 100% edible. Continue reading »

Edible Flower Petals Are Preserved In These Unique Lollipops

1

Janet Best (of Sugar Bakers Bakery) has perfected the uncommon art of flower lollipops. Using high-quality ingredients and edible flowers, Best jokes, “It looks as though I’ll be growing lollipops this year!” She boasts a playful aesthetic by incorporating these natural ingredients into her treats, which include delicate flowers grown indoors (to avoid insecticides and toxins). Continue reading »

14 Epic Pieces Of Edible ‘Harry Potter’ Food Art Made By Fans

While J.K. Rowling will be getting a few birthday wishes from fans today, we’re willing to bet she’ll only get one life-size, edible bust of Harry Potter’s head. A group of food artists from around the world collaborated to create some seriously impressive Potter-themed food art in celebration of the author’s 50th birthday, ranging from large character sculptures to intricate recreations of key scenes from the books. The project has been in the planning for the last year, after two U.S. bakers came up with the idea and recruited other members from across the world.

1
Harry Potter Bust, by Lara Clarke. IMAGE: LARA CLARKE

British cake sculptor and owner of Tasty Cakes, Lara Clarke, took part in the project by baking a life-size, edible bust of Harry Potter. “I didn’t time myself,” she told Mashable when asked how long it took her. “I watched the first three Harry Potter films while I was making it – so it probably took around six hours in total.” Continue reading »

‘The Ring’ Doughnut And ‘Game Of Thrones’ Cake: Introducing Lou Lou P And Her Incr-Edible Food Art

2
For the Game of Thrones fans out there, we’ve just found something to add to your list of merchandise: edible art! UK baker and food artist, Lou Lou P (previously), has recently crafted a series of cake pops depicting key Game of Thrones characters. But that’s not it! Continue reading »

Edible Insects in Thailand


Thai edible insect farmer Udom Sanart, 44, (R) sells crickets, edible insects at a fresh market in Khonkaen province, northeast of Thailand, 08 July 2013. Insects have long been on the menu in Thailand, but academics and the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) officials are hoping they will become a more common global source of protein and nutrients to meet the need for growing world food requirements in the future.

In both Asia and Europe, edible insects have increasingly been used as ingredients in processed foods, removing the squeamish factor of directly eating the bugs, while in many Asian countries vendors sell the fried whole insects in markets to eager less-squeamish customers. Thailand’s pioneering advances in commercial insect farming over the past 15 years has focused on three insect species seeing the annual production of crickets, palm weevils and bamboo caterpillars rise to an average of 7,500 tons of insects a year for domestic and export consumption.

Insect farms are located in about sixteen northeast provinces of Thailand. The UN agency estimates that world food production will need to increase 60 per cent from current levels to meet global food requirements by 2050, and has become a keen advocate of insect consumption. Not only does this type of farming have less impact on the environment than many other meat source farming, the insects are also very high in protein, vitamins and minerals necessary for a good diet. (Photo by Narong Sangnak/EPA)
Continue reading »