Lenin, Remade In Hydra In Bucharest By The Romanian Artist Costin Ionita

This sculpture is inspired from one of Lenin’s statues placed in Bucharest during the communist period. The head is represented by seven roses. The rose is a powerful and political symbol from the communist time, when the same old politicians continued their work and ruled over the country. The artwork is a metaphor of the corrupt system in Romania. Continue reading »

Monument To The Unknown Bureaucrat

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Several countries have monuments to the Unknown Soldier, but perhaps only Iceland has a sculpture honoring — and lightly satirizing — the thankless, anonymous job of the bureaucrat. The 1994 sculpture by Magnús Tómasson depicts a man in a suit holding a briefcase, with his head and shoulders subsumed in a slab of unsculpted stone. Continue reading »

An Artist’s Grocery List Becomes A Giant Monument In Central Park

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An immense granite monument to the mundane was erected in Central Park last week by the Public Art Fund. The 17-foot-tall stone slab is inscribed with a message that, by virtue of the medium, could outlast the civilization around it. For his new sculpture, MEMORIAL, British artist and author David Shrigley has carefully chosen words like “sausages,” “Nutella,” and “tampons”—like a deadpan “Ozymandias,” it’s possible the only record left of a post-apocalyptic New York City will be a grocery list. Continue reading »

Daredevil Skateboarding On A Giant Yugoslav Monument

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Yugoslavia just as any other communist-era regime had a strong need to spend money on making oversized concrete structures. This is why today Balkans are filled with all kind of otherworldly statues that people don’t know how to use. Until two Slovenians, Jan Robek and Miha Miklavcic saw an opportunity to use them for a skateboard ramp. The 20 year-old photographer created a interesting visual story during his ride of the alien-looking ww2 monument that was created by a Macedonian sculptor Dusan Dzamonja. Continue reading »

The Buzludzha Monument

Buzludzha is a historical peak in the Central Stara Planina, Bulgaria and is 1441 metres high. In 1868 it was the place of the final battle between Bulgarian rebels led by Hadji Dimitar and Stefan Karadzha and the Ottoman Empire.

The Buzludzha Monument on the peak was built by the Bulgarian communist regime to commemorate the events in 1891 when the socialists led by Dimitar Blagoev assembled secretly in the area to form an organised socialist movement with the founding of the Bulgarian Social Democratic Party, a fore-runner of the Bulgarian Communist Party. The Monument was opened in 1981. No longer maintained by the Bulgarian government, it has fallen into disuse. Buzludzha is reached by a 12 km side road from the Shipka Pass. Continue reading »

Photo of the Day: Moving with the Times. Soviet Monument gets a Facelift in Bulgaria.

A combination picture shows (top) the figures of Soviet soldiers at the base of the Soviet Army monument, painted by an unknown artist, in Sofia on June 17 and a member of the Bulgarian Socialist Party’s youth organisation cleaning the same figures of the monument February 18, 2010. The figures have been painted to resemble U.S. comic book heroes and characters from popular culture like Santa Claus and Ronald McDonald, the mascot of fast-food chain giant McDonald’s. The inscription below them reads: “Moving with the times”. Stoyan Nenov / Reuters. Click to zoom.