A Collection of Incredible Rare Color Photographs of France in World War I

Serving in the French Army, photographer Fernand Cuville (1887–1927) continued the autochromists’ tradition of recording the world around them in great detail. These color photographs were taken by Cuville in 1917. His photos capture French soldiers in everyday situations, including cleaning their clothes and eating lunch. They also show war’s destruction in scenes of crumbling buildings and ruined landscapes. Continue reading »

Candid Photographs Captured Prostitution Scenes in Paris in 1966

Prostitution in Paris, both street prostitution and prostitution from dedicated facilities has a long history but also its own modernity in the French capital. Prostitutes are mostly women but also include transgender people and men. Continue reading »

Artist JR Installed a Trompe-l’œil Canyon Illusion Under the Eiffel Tower


JR

An art installation has created the optical illusion that the French capital’s Eiffel Tower is perched precariously over a rocky ravine. Continue reading »

Amazing Rare Photographs of the Montparnasse Train Wreck in 1895


Roger Viollet/Getty Images

This extraordinary accident occurred on October 22, 1895 at Montparnasse, then known as Gare de l’Ouest. The drive of the express train from Granville to Paris, hoping to make up time for its 131 passengers, increased the train’s speed and the air brake failed. Continue reading »

Paris in Vivid Color Images by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont, 1923

Paris as seen from the church of Saint Gervais.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

These colored photos by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont will take you back through time to see how Paris looked in 1923. The vivid images are produced using the autochrome technique in which the plates are covered in microscopic red, green and blue colored potato starch grains (about four million per square inch). Continue reading »

When Paris Was Protected with Sandbags and Masking Tape, 1914-1918

Arc de Triomphe.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

By the first week of September 1914, the Germans had come within thirty kilometers of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris. The French and British armies were engaged in fierce fighting with the Germans in the First Battle of the Marne which repelled the Germans. Still, Parish remained uncomfortably close to the front lines for much of the Great War. Continue reading »

Artist Replaces Famous Parisian Monuments with Iconic Pop Culture Characters

French artist Benoit Lapray worked in collaboration with studio 95 Magenta and Emmanuelle Vonck Lugand to create this fantastic project that replaces famous Parisian monuments with iconic pop culture characters. Continue reading »

Fashion Designer Creates Paris Landmark and Skyscraper Puffer Jackets for Louis Vuitton

Fashion designer Virgil Abloh has made puffer jackets covered in Paris landmarks and well-known skyscrapers as part of the Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter menswear collection, which debuted in a Barcelona Pavilion-informed set. Continue reading »

Fabulous Cover Photos of La Vie Parisienne in 1927

La Vie Parisienne (the Parisian life) was a French weekly magazine founded in Paris in 1863 and was published without interruption until 1970. It was popular at the start of the 20th century. Continue reading »

The Spectacular World’s Fair Exposition Universelle in Rare Pictures, 1899

The Eiffel Tower viewed from the Champ du Mars.

AALTO University/Brown University Library Center

The 1889 World Fair in Paris was symbolically important, since the year 1889 marked the hundredth anniversary of the French Revolution, and the Fair was announced as a celebration of the event. It attracted more than thirty-two million visitors. The most famous structure created for the Exposition, and still remaining, is the Eiffel Tower. Continue reading »

Amazing Black and White Photographs Capture Everyday Life in France During the Mid-20th Century

Photographer Janine Niepce (February 12, 1921 – August 5, 2007), one of the first photo-journalists in France, was a distant cousin of Nicéphore Niépce, the inventor of photography. She photographed with great talent ordinary people going about their daily lives, much like humanist photographers Robert Doisneau and Willy Ronis. Influenced by Henri Cartier-Bresson, who gave her very sound advice on photo-journalism, she joined the Rapho Agency in 1955. Continue reading »

McDonald’s Surprises Parisians By Launching These New Unique-Looking Street Ads

When you think food advertising can’t get any better than it is now, someone finds a way to one-up the competition. It does raise the question of whether there is a point in advertising a thing we can’t live without, but I digress.

McDonald’s has come out with an advert—a street billboard—in the streets of Paris that has been drawing people’s attention lately with its unconventional public ad design. Continue reading »

Hats For Social Distancing From Chinese Dynasty 1,000 Years Ago Handed Out By Paris Art Gallery To Visitors


Reuters

An art gallery in Paris has sought inspiration in ancient China to help it enforce social distancing, by providing hats with winged extensions for visitors. Continue reading »

Eugene Atget – The Photographer Who Walked Fin de Siècle Paris

Eugene Atget (1857-1927) wandered the streets of Paris dressed in a large black cloak and floppy hat, his camera slung on its tripod over his shoulder. He drifted until something triggered a response which he stopped to photograph. Continue reading »

Paris Movie Theatre Skirts Lockdown With Alfresco Screening


Reuters

The coronavirus lockdown forced the team running Paris’s La Clef cinema to close their auditorium to moviegoers. So they hit on an alternative: projecting movies onto the wall of an adjacent apartment building. Continue reading »

The Extending Mini-Skirts In Paris In The Mid-1960s


Paris Match

The miniskirt was introduced in 1965 at the fashion show of French designer André Courreges. He felt that the design of women’s clothes was not keeping up with the modern trends of the 1950s and 1960s and wanted to introduce a look that was modern, streamlined, and easy. His miniskirts were A-line skirts, narrow at the waist and wider at the hem, that ended four inches above the knee. Continue reading »

“75 Parisiennes”: French Photographer Spends 6 Years Capturing Women In Paris

Mélanie, métro Anvers

This book in which a selection of 75 photographs are presented, is the outcome of six years of work by the portraitist Baudouin on the women of Paris. The photographs are a tribute to these Parisiennes, whose diversity and complexity have caused rivers of ink to flow. Continue reading »

Rebuilding Notre Dame In Photographs


Stephane de Sakutin/AP

Three months after a fire ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, a rare glimpse inside the burned masterpiece on Wednesday revealed it to be eerily empty and with rubble still littering the nave. Continue reading »

Beautiful Paris Cityscapes Through The Lens Of The Photographer Tatiana Liccia

Tatiana Liccia is an artist who started her Instagram account, although it has 19K+ followers, only 2 years ago! Although she has always been passionate about photography, it was only a year and a half ago that she bought her first camera. Continue reading »

Paris Just Before WWII: Stunning Photos Capture Daily Life Of The French Capital In The 1930s

Café, Paris, 1930. (Photo by Alexander Artway)

After the First World War ended. The French economy boomed from 1921 until the Great Depression reached Paris in 1931. This period, called Les années folles or the “Crazy Years”, saw Paris reestablished as a capital of art, music, literature and cinema. Continue reading »

Amazing Black & White Photographs That Capture Everyday Life Of Paris From The 1930s And Early 1940s

Roger Schall (1904-1995) was a renowned French photographer of the 1930s & 1940s. He worked in all photographic disciplines from fashion, portraits, nudes, still life and reportage. From June of 1940 to August 1944, Schall photographed German occupied Paris, hiding his negatives so they wouldn’t be found. Schall also documented post-war Paris and continued working as a photographer into the 1970s. Roger abandoned photography in 1967 and devoted himself to painting and managing his archives, which included nearly 100,000 images. Continue reading »

13 Concepts Showing How The Notre Dame Spire Could Look After Renovations


ejezeta.cl

On April 15, 2019, one of the most horrific fires of the year broke out when the roof of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris went up in flames. The inferno lasted for around 15 hours as the world watched in terror. The fire completely destroyed the structure’s iconic spire that collapsed hours after the fire was initially noticed. Most of the wood/metal roof of the cathedral was also destroyed, with only about one-third of the roof remaining. The interior of the cathedral didn’t suffer extensive damage thanks to the stone-vaulted ceiling that largely contained the burning roof as it collapsed. Continue reading »

Russian Architect Suggests Modern Notre-Dame De Paris Restoration Design

People in Russia have been deeply affected by the Notre-Dame de Paris cathedral blaze. The Russian authorities immediately offered the French help in restoring the architectural masterpiece, and soon Moscow will make a call for designers. Continue reading »

30 Artists’ Tributes To The Iconic Notre-Dame Cathedral


davpope

On 15 April 2019 around 6:50 p.m., a fire broke out in the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. One of the most famous historical buildings, it has a strong value to Parisian and French culture and is one of the most famous buildings in the world with around 13 million tourists every year. After the tragic news about the iconic cathedral burning went viral, many artists showed their respect to the monument by drawing it. Continue reading »

“A Cathedral That Defined A City”: 20 Rare Photographs Of Notre Dame From The 19th Century

When the architects of Cathedral of Notre-Dame set to work some 850 years ago, their goals were nothing if not ambitious. The church’s sanctuary, they decreed, must be taller than any built before. The nave would rise 108 feet, and the two 223-feet-tall towers would cast a far-reaching shadow over the roofs of Paris. Continue reading »