The Extending Mini-Skirts In Paris In The Mid-1960s


Paris Match

The miniskirt was introduced in 1965 at the fashion show of French designer André Courreges. He felt that the design of women’s clothes was not keeping up with the modern trends of the 1950s and 1960s and wanted to introduce a look that was modern, streamlined, and easy. His miniskirts were A-line skirts, narrow at the waist and wider at the hem, that ended four inches above the knee. Continue reading »

“75 Parisiennes”: French Photographer Spends 6 Years Capturing Women In Paris

Mélanie, métro Anvers

This book in which a selection of 75 photographs are presented, is the outcome of six years of work by the portraitist Baudouin on the women of Paris. The photographs are a tribute to these Parisiennes, whose diversity and complexity have caused rivers of ink to flow. Continue reading »

Rebuilding Notre Dame In Photographs


Stephane de Sakutin/AP

Three months after a fire ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, a rare glimpse inside the burned masterpiece on Wednesday revealed it to be eerily empty and with rubble still littering the nave. Continue reading »

Beautiful Paris Cityscapes Through The Lens Of The Photographer Tatiana Liccia

Tatiana Liccia is an artist who started her Instagram account, although it has 19K+ followers, only 2 years ago! Although she has always been passionate about photography, it was only a year and a half ago that she bought her first camera. Continue reading »

Paris Just Before WWII: Stunning Photos Capture Daily Life Of The French Capital In The 1930s

Café, Paris, 1930. (Photo by Alexander Artway)

After the First World War ended. The French economy boomed from 1921 until the Great Depression reached Paris in 1931. This period, called Les années folles or the “Crazy Years”, saw Paris reestablished as a capital of art, music, literature and cinema. Continue reading »

Amazing Black & White Photographs That Capture Everyday Life Of Paris From The 1930s And Early 1940s

Roger Schall (1904-1995) was a renowned French photographer of the 1930s & 1940s. He worked in all photographic disciplines from fashion, portraits, nudes, still life and reportage. From June of 1940 to August 1944, Schall photographed German occupied Paris, hiding his negatives so they wouldn’t be found. Schall also documented post-war Paris and continued working as a photographer into the 1970s. Roger abandoned photography in 1967 and devoted himself to painting and managing his archives, which included nearly 100,000 images. Continue reading »

13 Concepts Showing How The Notre Dame Spire Could Look After Renovations


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On April 15, 2019, one of the most horrific fires of the year broke out when the roof of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris went up in flames. The inferno lasted for around 15 hours as the world watched in terror. The fire completely destroyed the structure’s iconic spire that collapsed hours after the fire was initially noticed. Most of the wood/metal roof of the cathedral was also destroyed, with only about one-third of the roof remaining. The interior of the cathedral didn’t suffer extensive damage thanks to the stone-vaulted ceiling that largely contained the burning roof as it collapsed. Continue reading »

Russian Architect Suggests Modern Notre-Dame De Paris Restoration Design

People in Russia have been deeply affected by the Notre-Dame de Paris cathedral blaze. The Russian authorities immediately offered the French help in restoring the architectural masterpiece, and soon Moscow will make a call for designers. Continue reading »

30 Artists’ Tributes To The Iconic Notre-Dame Cathedral


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On 15 April 2019 around 6:50 p.m., a fire broke out in the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. One of the most famous historical buildings, it has a strong value to Parisian and French culture and is one of the most famous buildings in the world with around 13 million tourists every year. After the tragic news about the iconic cathedral burning went viral, many artists showed their respect to the monument by drawing it. Continue reading »

“A Cathedral That Defined A City”: 20 Rare Photographs Of Notre Dame From The 19th Century

When the architects of Cathedral of Notre-Dame set to work some 850 years ago, their goals were nothing if not ambitious. The church’s sanctuary, they decreed, must be taller than any built before. The nave would rise 108 feet, and the two 223-feet-tall towers would cast a far-reaching shadow over the roofs of Paris. Continue reading »

This Artist Created An Incredible Optical Illusion At The Louvre Just So It Could Be Destroyed In A Few Days

Even if you have never been to Paris, you probably know that it’s a city rich in both culture and stunning architecture. There are so many things to see – from the Arc de Triomphe and the Eiffel Tower to the busy narrow streets and beautiful open boulevards – all of this will make you feel like you’re a part of a romantic movie. And if you ever get to visit Paris, don’t forget to visit the Louvre – not only is it the largest art museum in the world, the building itself is a sight worth seeing as well. Continue reading »

“Les Amies de Place Blanche”: Captivating Portraits Of Paris Transsexuals In The 1950s

Originally published in 1983, Les Amies de Place Blanche (Ladies of the Place Blanche) focuses on the transsexual community living around the Place Blanche district of Paris in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The book established Christer Strömholm’s reputation as one of the leading photographers of the twentieth century. Continue reading »

A Look Back On the French Capital Nearly 100 Years Ago Through The Lens Of Photographer Jean Pierre Yves-Petit

Photographs of the City of Light taken by a master photographer in the early part of the twentieth century. The photographer Pierre Yves-Petit, who called himself “Yvon,” wandered the streets of Paris between the world wars looking for the moment when the shifting light and clouds would perfectly reveal the city’s ephemeral, iconic beauty. The dramatic images of the city and its people that he made during those years would become the most popular postcards in France. They can still be bought today on Parisian quais and are eagerly sought by collectors. Continue reading »

Stunning Black & White Pictures Of Yhe Louvre And Its Visitors From Between The 1960s And 1990s

Very patiently with a camera in his hand the Brazilian photographer Alecio de Andrade manages to capture incredible pictures of the visitors of the Louvre. He has been making these pictures for almost four decades.

What is the relation between these three scenes? All three of them are moments captured in the halls of the most famous museum in the world – the Louvre. Moments, which the photographer Alecio de Andrade has been patiently waiting for 39 whole years. Continue reading »

Paris’ Utopian Village Of Concrete Cabbage

This hypnotic, vegetable utopia might look like it rolled out of a Stanley Kubrick film set, but it was in fact the dream project of French architect Gérard Grandval. Continue reading »