The Kings Of The Forest – Photographer Spent 3 Days In Nepal To Document The Isolated Tribe


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

Hidden deep in the Himalayan forest is one of the world’s last enduring nomadic tribes who are resisting attempts to move them into permanent settlements. The Raute tribe has no permanent home and frequently moves between camps. Living as hunter-gatherers and eating the meat of langur and macaque monkeys – a controversial choice in the Hindu dominated country of Nepal, where monkeys are considered to be the reincarnation of the God Hanuman. With the assistance of a local journalist, Danish photographer Jan Møller Hansen spent three days in January 2016 travelling from Nepal’s capital of Kathmandu into a remote forest in Accham District, Nepal to document the isolated group – who call themselves the Kings of the Forest.

More info: Facebook

When a Raute dies they are buried in the forest in an upright position, their skull is also pierced to release their spirit into heaven:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

A young Raute baby peeks out of her shroud:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

To enter the Raute community visitors must give something back to the community:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

In the wet monsoon season the Raute people move to high altitudes and in dryer winters they migrate to lower subtropical forests:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

Children gather around a small fire underneath one of the Raute’s tents:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

Many of the Raute people have been resettled by the Government of Nepal but this remaining nomadic tribe continues to resist the change:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

No outsiders are permitted to stay inside their camps overnight or accompany them on hunting trips:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

Only 156 people remained in the tribe when Jan visited in Accham District, Nepal:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

The Raute people are nomadic and move between camps based on the seasons:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

The Raute rely heavily on monkey meat and on the plant life provided by the forest:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

The Raute people are primarily hunter-gatherers but they also build wooden furniture for trading with other local villages:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

When a Raute dies they are buried in the forest in an upright position, their skull is also pierced to release their spirit into heaven:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

A young Raute girl poses for a portrait in the midst of the small camp:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

In the wet monsoon season the Raute people move to high altitudes and in dryer winters they migrate to lower subtropical forests:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

If someone dies in the community they immediately pack up and move to a new site to avoid evil spirits:


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images


Jan Moller Hansen/Barcroft Images

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below


If you want more awesome content, subscribe to 'Oh, Design You Trust,' our brand new Facebook page! Trust me, you won't be disappointed.

More Inspiring Stories

Musical Roads That Play Melodies When Cars Drive Over
"Big In Japan": 30 Times People Traveled To Japan And Realized They’re Too Tall For It
Breathtaking Photos Of Traditional Eagle Hunting In Mongolia
Extraordinary Images Of The Costa Concordia Cruise Ship By Jonathan Danko Kielkowski
Beautiful Scenes From Lunar New Year Celebrations Across Asia
An Instagram Account Dedicated To Learning Basic French Through Beautiful Typography
Dive In And Join The Chaos – If You Can Find Any Water Left In These Crowded Swimming Pools
Wonderland Abandoned: The Swift Fall of “Europe’s Biggest Theme Park”
Gadhimai Festival in Nepal
Jadayupara, The Largest Bird Sculpture In The World
Rare Snowfall On The Acropolis In Athens, Greece
Naturally Erupted Elephant Rock In Iceland
Brazil's Drought from Above
The Story Of David Glasheen, A Real Life Robinson Crusoe
Annual Cold-Endurance Festival in Tokyo
First Sahara Desert Snow Miracle In 40 Years Captured In Stunning Photographs
This Woman And Her Cat Have Been On The Most Gorgeous Sailboat Adventure Since 2006
The Pantone Cafe Serves The Colorful Meal Of Your Dreams
This Is Strange But True
China: Then and Now
Daily Life in Japan
This Camper Does Triple Duty as an Office, Lounge and Bedroom
Chinese Village Is Home To 39 Sets Of Twins
Living on the Indian Dump: Life of Garbage Pickers
Daily Life in Cuba
Tokyo's Robot Restaurant
Amazing Vintage Color Photos Of Trailer Parks In The United States From Between The 1950s And 1960s
Chinese Tourists Cram China's Biggest Pool Named 'The Dead Sea' On Hot Day
Christmas Decorations in Germany
Nomadic Photographer Lives, Works & Travels Solo In Her Trusty Teardrop Trailer