Brazilian Families Pose With Children Affected By Zika Virus

Associated Press photographer Felipe Dana has captured the love of families for their babies born with microcephaly – one of the medical problems caused by the Zika virus – in Recife, Pernambuco state, in Brazil. He used instant film so they could immediately see the portraits and keep the prints.

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Photo by Felipe Dana/AP

Rosana Alves holds her daughter Luana. Alves has three daughters and has left work to take care of Luana, who is equipped with specially designed leg braces to help position her feet. Continue reading »

Venezuelan Crisis Leaves Families With Empty Fridges

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A combination photo shows the contents of peoples fridges in Caracas, Venezuela April 2016. The combination of Venezuela’s sky-rocketing prices and chronic product shortages have left many struggling to put regular food on their tables and maintain a balanced diet. Amid a severe recession and dysfunctional state-run economy, poorer families say they are sometimes skipping meals and relying more on starch foods. According to one recent study, 87 percent of Venezuelans say their income is now insufficient to purchase their food needs. (Photo by Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters) Continue reading »

Brad Pitt Has Built Over 100 Homes For Families Who Had Lost Everything During The Hurricane

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Ten years ago, the most destructive hurricane in the US history, Katrina, razed almost the whole of New Orleans to the ground. It swept off thousands of lives and left a lot of families homeless. The actor Brad Pitt was so shocked by the tragedy that he founded the Make It Right Foundation to help the victims of the hurricane. Continue reading »

Luxury ‘Doomsday Bunker’ Will Allow 34 Super Rich Families To Survive The Apocalypse

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Blast door crane

What do you buy the billionaire that has everything? A one way ticket to life after Armageddon. Continue reading »

This Artist’s Photos of Mixed-Race Families Prove That Relationships Trump All Borders

“Mixed Blood” shows just some of many interracial families around the world. Unfortunately, there are still many societal factors that discourage ethnic, racial, and cultural mixing. These racist and xenophobic attitudes are still a cancer to society.

As mixing gradually goes mainstream, people have begun to identify and relate to the world and each other in different ways.

To document this mixing and the intersections of different cultures, Korean-American photographer CYJO spent three years between New York City and Beijing taking pictures of families. What came out of this exploration of race, culture and identity is an ongoing photo series called “Mixed Blood.”

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Snodgrass Family, 2013. Citizenships: American, Chinese. Ancestries: German, Han Chinese, Irish. Languages: English, Mandarin. They live in Beijing. (All photos & captions © CYJO) Continue reading »

Chinese families with all their stuff in a single photo by Huang Qingjun


Try mentally lining up all of your stuff in one place. Some may gather only few pots and blankets while others probably couldn’t fit everything they own into a stadium. Chinese photographer Huang Qingjun explores this topic in his photo series called “Jiadang,” or “Family Stuff”.

For the last 10 years, Huang has been traveling around China’s rural communities and capturing pictures of families with their household possessions carefully arranged outdoors, usually in front of their houses. With this project, Huang seeks to portray the lives of people living in remote rural areas, far from big cities where wealth is the most important social factor. His pictures show the simplicity of people’s basic needs: all most of them have are a few chairs, drawers, buckets and vases. However, we can also see the impact of modernization because almost every family owns a satellite TV, a DVD or a phone.

As the photographer says, “most people thought what I was proposing was not normal. When I explained I wanted to set up a photo, that it would involve taking everything out of their house and setting it up outside, that took quite a lot of explaining. But almost all of them, when they realized what I was trying to do, they understood the point.” Now Huang Qingjun is considering a new approach that might feature portraits of China’s higher classes. Continue reading »