Hundreds Of Local Indian Artists Painted The Forgotten Railway Station With The Famous Traditional Artwork


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE

Tourists and locals were flocking to the erstwhile forgotten Madhubani railway station in the eastern Indian state of Bihar, which has undergone a makeover after hundreds of local Mithila artists painted the station walls with the famous Madhubani artwork, known the world over for its unique geometrical patterns.

230 artists have painted over 2000 sq. meters of the station for free, although equipment was provided by the railway authorities, who claim these could be the largest Madhubani illustration in the world. Madhubani is one of the state of Bihar’s oldest railway stations, and the makeover project comes as part of the Indian government’s Swachh Bharat mission or Clean India Mission.

The Mithila artwork, also known as Madhubani paintings, originated in Nepal and India, depicts scenes from folklore and mythology, including special designs for occasions such as birth and marriage.

Artists used fingers, twigs, brushes, nib-pens, matchsticks and natural dyes and pigments to paint the Madhubani designs, a skill that is passed down through generations. Traditionally, Madhubani artwork – which boasts the coveted GI (Geographical Indication) tag – would adorn the walls and floors of huts in villages, although they are now painted mostly on cloth and canvas or handmade paper. The makeover has meant the number of daily visitors to the train station has more than doubled, according to a railway spokesperson.


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE


Harish Tyagi/EPA/EFE

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