Amazing Surreal And Glitchy Ceramic Artworks By Keiko Masumoto

It’s a common misconception that traditional arts don’t change, and that they don’t lend themselves to modern concepts. For example, people think that traditional ceramics are only meant to be copies of previous masterpieces, but Keiko Masumoto begs to differ and creates a tasteful blend between the traditional and modern. Continue reading »

Japanese Artist Creates Incredible Realistic Intimate Garments from Ceramics

Masami Yamamoto is a Japanese artist based in Kanazawa largely working in the medium of ceramics. Since around 2011 the artist has been developing a series based on used—often intimate—clothing as a means of creating portraits of the owner of that item. Continue reading »

Pandemics Past, Green Futures Merge in Ceramic Gas Mask Pot from Franco-Japanese Project

TENEO, a fashion brand embodying the finest elements of French and Japanese materials and production, has teamed up with master ceramicist Shibukusa Ryūzō, 7th generation of the Shibukusa Ryūzō Ceramics Factory operating since 1841 in Takayama City, Gifu Prefecture, on a bold new project. Continue reading »

This Artist Creates Mesmerizing Mugs With Tiny Animals ‘Living’ In Them, And Her Instagram Followers Love It

Cups and mugs are some of the best things you can ever get as a gift for someone: it doesn’t require a huge investment, whether financially or emotionally, it’s both beautiful and practical, and, most importantly, it shows that you care. Continue reading »

Thrifted Vintage Plates Made Irreverent With Typography By Marie-Claude Marquis

Canadian artist Marie-Claude Marquis gives a new meaning to antique second-hand plates with witty typographical interventions. Often irreverent and full of trending pop culture references, her one-liners address and poke fun at our society in the digital age, sexuality, religion, consumerism, and mental health. The subjects she tackles spiced up with a humorous approach make her work bold and controversial. Continue reading »

Tattooed Ceramics By Evelyn Tannus

Brazilian artist Evelyn Tannus paints beautiful surface designs on elegant ceramic statues of Greyhound dogs. She turns their normally-neutral-colored coats to hues like mint green, sky blue, and lilac. In addition, Evelyn draws flowers, geometric patterns, human figures, and much, much more on the dogs’ bodies and heads. Continue reading »

Artist Brings Ceramics To Life

Sculptor Ronit Baranga creates a combination of the still and the alive by adding human fingers and mouths to tableware. The result is creepy, funny, and disturbing at the same time. Continue reading »

Galaxy Inspired Ceramics That Allow You To Drink From The Stars

Thanks to artist Amanda Joy Wells everyone can have a drink with the stars. Continue reading »

Hello, Is It Me You’re Cooking For? Creative Ceramics By Lenny Mud

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A ceramicist with an obvious sense of humour, Lenny the cat’s owner creates all manner of things such as mugs, bowls, and pots. As well as some of my favourite items from the shop featured below. Continue reading »

This Artist Creates A Ceramics Imprinted With Patterns Of Vintage Typewriter Letters

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Ceramic artist Laura C. Hewitt creates a wide range of cups, plates, and other ceramic objects imprinted with letters and numbers from old typewriter keys. The Alaska-based artist utilizes fragments from mathematical formulas, programming languages, and other science-influenced designs, all carefully applied with a variety of typewriter letters in black ink to create one-of-a-kind pieces. Continue reading »

Housewares To Make You Smile By Beardbangs Ceramics

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“We’re Alicia and Jo of Beardbangs, a wife and husband team that attempts to make the cutest housewares imaginable by transforming illustrations into ceramic objects.” Continue reading »

Trompe L’Oeil Ceramics That Imitate The Natural Appearance Of Decaying Wood

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

Ceramicist Christopher David White accurately captures the decay of wood through ceramics, portraying the distinct character of the natural material from the fine wood grain to the light ash coloration at the pieces’ edges. By utilizing a trompe l’oeil technique, White forces the viewer to take a closer look at his work while also investigating the truth hidden in the hyperrealistic sculptures. Continue reading »