Before the Photoshop Era, Here Are What Manipulated Photos Looked Like in the Early 20th Century

“Pumpkins grown in Iowa soil are profitable”

Photo manipulation dates back to some of the earliest photographs captured on glass and tin plates during the 19th century. The practice began not long after the creation of the first photograph (1825) by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce who developed heliography and made the first photographic print from a photoengraved printing plate. Continue reading »

The America We Lost: Fascinating Found Photos Show How Life of the US Looked Like in the 1960s

Florida gulf, 1962

The 1960s were a decade of revolution and change in politics, music and society around the world. It started in the United States and the United Kingdom, and spread to continental Europe and other parts of the globe. Continue reading »

The 1955 GMC L’Universelle Dream Truck

One of the most popular General Motors design concept models designed under the direction of Harley Earl was the 1955 GMC L’Universelle show van. The name “L’Universelle” is French and means “The Universal.” The model was a part of the Motorama shows during the 1950s, which created a huge buzz among crowds at the time. Continue reading »

The Mandalorian Season 2 Premiere Recreated As Classic Marvel Star Wars Comic

The Mandalorian’s season 2 premiere has received the classic Marvel Comics cover treatment in this new piece of fan art. It’s the krayt dragon battle that’s received special attention in this new piece from artist @dvglzv (previously). Din (with Baby Yoda in tow) is shown flying in the air above the krayt dragon as though the scene was in a classic comic book. The retro comic cover look is a fun way to view this scene, particularly because it looks like it could fit in perfectly with the rest of the Star Wars comic world. Continue reading »

GCDS 2021 Calendar Viva L’Italia by Nadia Lee Cohen

Nadia Lee Cohen’s photographs and films, heavily inspired by Americana and Britain in the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s, are veritable visions of saturated, surreal dreamscapes. Drawing upon the duality of the female form, fine art photographer and filmmaker Lee Cohen locks our optics upon the twisted paradise that lurks within her mind. Continue reading »

Incredible Black and White Photos Capture Street Scenes of NYC in the 1950s

However, after peaking in population in 1950, the city began to feel the effects of white flight to the suburbs, a downturn in industry and commerce as businesses left for places where it was cheaper and easier to operate, an increase in crime, and an upturn in its welfare burden, all of which reached a nadir in the city’s fiscal crisis of the 1970s, when it barely avoided defaulting on its obligations and declaring bankruptcy. Continue reading »

Rare Hand-Colored Photographs of Japan on The Brink of Modernity in 1870s

Street minstrel, Gose.

Here’re a few rare photographs from the 1870s taken by Shinichi Suzuki (1835-1918) who photographed Japan for a foreign newsmagazine called The Far East.

After his lumber family business was destroyed by a tsunami in 1854, Suzuki traveled to Yokohama where he became an established photographer. Many of his photographs were hand-colored, which is why they appear more realistic and modern than the black and white photos of that era. Continue reading »

Previous Generations Sure Knew a Thing or Two About Style

“My movie star looking grandparents sitting for a portrait in the early 1940s”

thechive

Do you ever get the feeling that people are not as stylish and glamorous today as they were in the past? Many of us had this thought pass through our minds when watching a period drama or even when looking through old family photos. It could be that people put more effort into their appearance back then, or it could be the fact that taking a picture was a much rarer occurrence than today, so everyone made sure they looked their best when it happened. Continue reading »

“Someone Else’s Dream”: ’80s-Inspired Illustrations by James White

James White aka Signalnoise is a Canadian illustrator and designer living in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. He creates neon-infused artwork for his various personal projects as well as for clients such as Lego Movie 2, Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon, Hasbro, Metallica, Nike, Universal Music etc.

He’s very stuck in the 1980s. Continue reading »

50 Obsolete Things To Prove How Much The World Has Moved On And Changed

Blank VHS Covers Had Some Wild Artwork

There are two things that keep my spirits up when everything seems to be going wrong—daydreaming and nostalgia. If you’ve got the blues, there’s nothing like cuddling under a warm blanket, grabbing a mug of hot tea and some childhood snacks, and thinking back to the good old days. (Preferably with an old movie, game, or soundtrack to help you get in the right mood.) Continue reading »

Explorer’s Stunning Photographs of The Arctic Sun from 100 Years Ago

Donald Baxter MacMillan (November 10, 1874 – September 7, 1970) was an American explorer, sailor, researcher and lecturer who made over 30 expeditions to the Arctic during his 46-year career. He pioneered the use of radios, airplanes, and electricity in the Arctic, brought back films and thousands of photographs of Arctic scenes, and put together a dictionary of the Inuktitut language. Continue reading »

Artist Using Photoshop Technique to Manipulate Bizarre Christmas Photos With Her Beloved Dog

Using Photoshop technique, Jen Hack manipulated some bizarre Christmas photos from the early 20th century with her beloved dog Yukon. Continue reading »

Belfast in Amazing Rare Color Photographs, 1955


Bert Hardy/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

These amazing color photos of Belfast capture the shipyards, the lively streets, the everyday life, the fashion, and document a city worlds away from the one we know today. The pictures were taken by documentary and Press photographer, Bert Hardy, who’s best known for his work in the Picture Post magazine. Continue reading »

Zappa Claus: “Merry Christmas and Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow!”

Santa Claus is mentioned in Frank Zappa’s song “Uncle Bernie’s Farm” from Absolutely Free (1967), which briefly quotes White Christmas in the beginning. On the cover of We’re Only in It for the Money (1968) a Christmas Tree can be seen. Continue reading »

Beautiful Flight Attendant Uniforms Around the World From the 1970s

Pan-Am

David Reed/Getty Images

We’ve come a long way since the early days of flying, from the rough-ride commercial airliners in the early 1900s to the glamorous, smoke-fogged flights of the 1960s. Continue reading »

Before Seatbelts and Airbags: Terrible Photos of Car Accidents in the Early 20th Century

A car and train collision on the level crossing at Weasenham Lane, Wisbech, March 4, 1910

By 1950, almost every race-car driver used safety seat belts.

American car manufacturers Nash (in 1949) and Ford (in 1955) offered seat belts as options, while Swedish Saab first introduced seat belts as standard in 1958. After the Saab GT 750 was introduced at the New York Motor Show in 1958 with safety belts fitted as standard, the practice became commonplace. Continue reading »

“View from the Top”: A Historical Look at The Beautiful Stewardesses of The 1960s-1980s

Pacific Southwest Airlines employee in mini-skirts and go-go boots.

The flight attendant occupation took permanent shape in the 1930s as “women’s work,” that is, work not only predominately performed by women but also defined as embodying white, middle-class ideals of femininity. Continue reading »

The 1986 Oldsmobile Incas Had The Wildest Dashboard You’ve Never Seen

Plenty of automakers today release autonomous car concepts that look like an ultra-modern living room inside. The steering wheel isn’t there, or it folds away, there’s big touchscreens everywhere—you get the gist. But 34 years ago, at the height of wonderfully strange ’80s design exercises, Italdesign really went for it in the Oldsmobile “Incas” concept with this Knight Rider-looking getup. It’s definitely not your grandfather’s Oldsmobile. Neither will it be your grandson’s, sadly. Continue reading »

A Collection of Fabulous Potato-Themed Real Photo Postcards From the Early 20th Century


The Square America Archive

WARNING: if you are a PL (Potato Lover), some of these photos might be too hot to handle! Continue reading »

This Guy Used AI To Colorize Hollywood Stars Of The Golden Age And Here’s What He Got In Only A Few Seconds

Audrey Hepburn

According to Bored Panda user named Hidrėlėy: “Nowadays, photographers use black and white photography to convey emotion by playing with tones, contrasts, and shadows, but it wasn’t always an option to choose. Color photography brings photographs to life and reveals every little vivid detail that creates a compelling image. Photographers from the past could only convey the world they were living in in black and grey. Have you ever wondered what these photographers saw that very moment? I have. Continue reading »

Beautiful Portraits of Vietnamese Girls From the Youth of the Republic, 1961


Larry Burrows/Life Magazine

The Youth of the Republic (Thanh Nữ Cộng Hòa) is a paramilitary organization of the Can Lao Party under Ngo Dinh Diem. Under the leadership of Tran Le Xuan, the wife of adviser Ngo Dinh Diem, this organization often has monumental force demonstrations, attracting the attention of the press both nationally and internationally. Continue reading »

Beautiful Vintage Photos Show How Cool Moms Were in the 1960s

“Mom at a New Year’s Eve party at Aunt Mary & Uncle Frank Martinelli’s house on Redmont Rd., Dec. 31, 1965”

The 1960s saw a flourishing in art, music and fashion. The term “The Sixties” is used to denote the complex of inter-related cultural and political trends around the globe during this era. Continue reading »

Sea Monkeys, X-Ray Specs, and the Twisted Secret Behind Vintage Ads from American Comic Books

American comics first came to Glasgow as ships’ ballast. In the sixties it seemed every other corner shop had a stash of these glossy-covered comics displayed on carousels or placed beside their tamer British counterparts like Beano, Topper, or Dandy. With comics like Thor, Hulk, Superman and co. it was difficult to keep collecting consecutive numbers as it was pot luck as to what arrived in the shop every month. Continue reading »

Cool Vintage Photos of Victorian People Posing With Their Penny-Farthings

The penny-farthing, also known as a high wheel, high wheeler or ordinary, was the first machine to be called a “bicycle”. It was popular in the 1870s and 1880s, with its large front wheel providing high speeds (owing to it traveling a large distance for every rotation of the legs) and comfort (the large wheel provides greater shock absorption). Continue reading »

Uranium Glass – Collectible Radioactive Glassware From a Bygone Era


Till Westermeyer

Believe it or not, there was once a time when people exposed themselves to harmful levels of radiation to create uranium glass – detailed, fluorescent glassware that glowed a radioactive green under black light. Some antique collectors still live with them in their homes today. Continue reading »