Photos Of Time Before The Invention Of That Grossly Antisocial Device: The Smartphone

We’ve all heard our parents say it: “Look up from your phone every once in a while”, “Hey, talk to me don’t text”, “Why are you being so anti-social on your phone?” They claim that in the good old days everything was different… Continue reading »

“Goodbye, Diesel Train”: This Brutal Soviet Bad Boy Has Been Destroyed In Estonia

Couple days ago near Tallinn, Estonia, Soviet train has been destroyed. A survived old Russian loco called “DR1A-2283″ (just like droids in Star Wars) found its last grave in Estonia and we have photos how it was. It was pretty nice design, might be used in a museum, but they scrapped it for the metal. Continue reading »

“Small Town Noir” – Twenty-One ’30s And ’40s Mugshots From New Castle, Pennsylvania


Jessie Smith left her home in South Carolina before the First World War and spent the next two decades working as a prostitute in New Castle. Her mug shot was taken on 22 February, 1932, after she stole a client’s pocketbook.

When the police department of the once-prosperous small town of New Castle, Pennsylvania, threw out thousands of mid-century mug shots in the late 1990s, a few hundred were saved from destruction by one police officer. The pictures ended up scattered across the world after he sold themon ebay. Continue reading »

Quirky And Daring: Best Soviet Concept Cars

In 1988, Minsk Automobile Plant designers created a prototype of a truck called MAZ 2000 Perestroika. It was revealed to the public at the foreign Paris International Motor Show and received the highest ratings from foreign experts.

These innovative projects were designed to breathe new life into the Soviet automobile industry, but due to the collapse of the USSR, they never went into serial production. Today’s concept cars can provide us with a glimpse into the future and give us a sense of the direction being taken by manufacturers as they use the newest technology of tomorrow.

However, sometimes it’s equally fascinating to look into the past. These quirky Russian car designs from way back provide an insight into the innovative and daring concepts of engineers from the USSR, which paved the way for modern cars. Continue reading »

Men Behaving Badly On Saucy Vintage Postcards

For some reason, in the early decades of the 20th century it was a “thing” to send sleazy cartoon postcards while on vacation. Looking through postcards from the 1930s-1950s, you’ll find not as many photographs of tourist locations as you will bawdy cartoons. It’s a fascinating social documentation on public tolerance for this risqué subject matter – much of it would be wildly inappropriate today. Continue reading »

Artist Transforms Victorian Portraits Into Modern Pop Culture Trading Cards

Artist Alex Gross transforms 19th-century portraits into amusing mashups with iconic figures of popular culture. Using the sepia-toned photographs as his initial inspiration, Gross paints on cabinet cards (these were a style of portraits mounted on a 4.25-inch by 6.5-inch sheet that had widespread appeal after 1870). When he’s done, the anonymous men and women from yesteryear are retro versions of superheroes, villains, and famous figures from pop culture. Continue reading »

These Men’s Fashion Ads From The 1970s That Will Leave You Speechless

The 1970s must have taken place on a different planet. These photos of men’s fashions from that decade leave us drowning in astounding mustard knits, garish patterns, high waists, way-too-skimpy briefs, and other fashion faux pas that defy description 40 years later. Continue reading »

Before Facebook: This Is How We Used to Unfriend People Back Then

Remember when unfriending people was just scratching or tearing out their faces on your photographs… Below is a collection of 20 vintage photos show how we used to “unfriend” people back then. Continue reading »

There Was Sex In The USSR: Soviet Car Advertising From The Past

An advertisement for the Soviet GAZ-24 ‘Volga’. The Volga was the main dream of every man and many women in the Soviet Union.

There were times when the VAZ-2101 ‘Zhiguli’ was advertised as an exclusive car, and even photographed with giraffes while the GAZ ‘Volga’ was the dream of every citizen, and sausage was considered a delicacy. Continue reading »

Fascinating Photos of Chicago’s Tri-Taylor Neighborhood From 1971

These photos of the Tri-Taylor neighborhood on Chicago’s Near West Side were taken by Lou Fourcher as a graduate student while participating in the University of Illinois-Chicago’s Valley Project. Continue reading »

As The Standard Of The World Turns: Lovely Photos Of 1965 Cadillac Coupe DeVille

Cadillac was “Standard of the World” in motoring pleasure and owner loyalty. “So new, so right, so obviously Cadillac!” This editorial is dedicated to those who regard their motorcars as prized possessions. Once one has been in the driver’s seat of a new Cadillac… it is difficult to become content with any other car.

Here is another classic DeVille encore performance… in the continuing saga of “As the Standard of the World Turns.” Continue reading »

Honeywell Kitchen Computer, The $70,000 Machine That No One Bought In The Late 1960s

Original advertisement for the Kitchen Computer: “If she can only cook as well as Honeywell can compute.” Why would anyone want a computer at home? Before the personal computer era and its avalanche of possible uses, the perennial answer was: “to store recipes.” Continue reading »

Supercool Pics Of Bugatti Cars In The 1920s And 1930s


1927 Bugatti Type 41 Royale Coupe Napoleon with family driver

Bugatti was founded in in 1909 in Molsheim, France by Ettore Bugatti an Italian imigrant. The company produced expensive, and in the case of the Royalle some of the most exclusive bespoke cars in the world. The T35’s and T51’s were amongst the most sucessful voiterette racing cars.

Bugatti also produced aircraft engines and the engines for French rail cars. The badge not only bears the name Bugatti but the initials of Ettore Bugatti with an inverted E. Continue reading »

“Freezing The City That Never Sleeps”: A Brooklyn Chemist’s 1800s Photos Capture New York In Motion


June 26, 1886. Jamie Swan jumps off a short stone wall at Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn. IMAGE: WALLACE G. LEVISON/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

Wallace G. Levison was a chemist, inventor, and lecturer who founded the Departments of Mineralogy and Astronomy at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences in the latter half of the 19th century. He was also an avid photographer, using the new technology both as a scientific tool and a recreational activity. As the dawn of the 20th century approached, newer, more sensitive film emulsions were developed that allowed pictures to be taken with faster and faster shutter speeds. Continue reading »

The Isolator: This Insane Anti-Distraction Helmet From 1925 Would Fit Into Any Modern Open Office

Maybe you blame your smartphone or your open office for the fact that you can’t concentrate at work. But distraction isn’t exactly a new problem: In the 1920s, Hugo Gernsback published a design for a creepy-looking helmet that blocks out sound and vision so someone can focus on their work. As a writer, editor and inventor, he had a lot to do and no time for distractions. And yet, they lurked everywhere he looked. So, he created something he called “The Isolator”. Continue reading »