21 Historical Photos That Prove The World Has Changed Dramatically

School dance in the 1950s

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Just imagine how fast our world is changing! Even 50 years ago life was very different. Online banking and portable computers didn’t exist, and fashion didn’t change that fast. Maybe that’s why nowadays it is so interesting to see vintage photos. They always seem to put that nostalgic, cute smile on our faces. Continue reading »

“What If Orthodox Priests Became Cosmonauts?”: Artist Unites Two Russian Pillars In His Paintings

Russian digital painter Vladimir Malakhovsky has created a series of bold canvases. He’s combined two subjects, both of which are very important in Russia: Space exploration vs the Orthodox church. Continue reading »

UK Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition 2018 Winners


Overall winner and astronomy winner: Three Diamonds in the Sky by Petr Horálek. When a solar eclipse started in November 2013 (on the left side of the image), there were two “diamond ring” solar flares, which was unusual. The magnitude of coverage from Pakwero, Uganda, was just 1.00259, which means the sun was only just covered and light could shine through two parts of the lunar limb. (Photo by Petr Horálek/Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition 2018) Continue reading »

The Merging Art & Science Of Daniel Martin Diaz

Daniel Martin Diaz is a fine artist based in Tucson, Arizona, characterised by his unique way of representing the mysteries of life merged with the realms of science. Immersed in scientific and philosophical concepts, Diaz has been mainly fascinated with scientific diagrams which explain theories and properties through the use of images. Continue reading »

“The Art And Science Of Ernst Haeckel”: A Compendium Of Colorfully Rendered 19th-Century Biological Illustrations

Discover Ernst Haeckel, the 19th-century artist-biologist who found beauty in even the most unlikely of creatures. This collection features 450 prints from his most important publications, including the majestic Kunstformen der Natur and his extensive catalogues of marine life. As biodiversity is ever-more threatened, these exquisite images are a scientific, artistic, and environmental masterwork. Continue reading »

Snow, Science And Solitude: Living On The Edge Of The World

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Snow covers Broggerdalen mountain near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway October 11, 2015. A Norwegian chain of islands just 1,200 km (750 miles) from the North Pole is trying to promote new technologies, tourism and scientific research in a shift from high-polluting coal mining that has been a backbone of the remote economy for decades. Norway suspended most coal mining on the Svalbard archipelago last year because of the high costs, and is looking for alternative jobs for about 2,200 inhabitants on islands where polar bears roam. Part of the answer may be to boost science: in Ny-Alesund, the world’s most northerly permanent non-military settlement, scientists from 11 nations including Norway, Germany, France, Britain, India and South Korea study issues such as climate change. The presence of Norway, a NATO member, also gives the alliance a strategic foothold in the far north, of increasing importance after neighbouring Russia annexed Ukraine’s Crimea region in 2014. (Photo by Anna Filipova/Reuters)
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Humanoid Robots at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Technology

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Japanese android expert Hiroshi Ishiguro, left, talks with new talking robot Sota, right, Android robot Otonaroid, second left, and another talking robots CommU, center and second right, during a press event at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation Miraikan in Tokyo Tuesday, January 20, 2015. Ishiguro, the scientist behind the new talking robot in Japan says people should stop expecting robots to understand them, and instead try to chime in with robotic conversations. Ishiguro’s 28-centimer (11-inch) tall button-eyed Sota, which stands for “social talker”, is programmed to mainly talk with a fellow robot, and won’t be trying too hard to understand human speech – the major, and often frustrating, drawback of companion robots. (Photo by Shizuo Kambayashi/AP Photo)
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Museum Uses Brilliant Ads To Get You Excited About Science

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Science people have all the brains, even when it comes to a spot of advertising. Wanting to engage the public with science —in a way that was both thought-provoking and fun—Vancouver’s Science World teamed up with creative agency Rethink Canada to produce these very clever ads. No need to double check these quirky facts, they’re all scientifically verified, promise. Continue reading »

Collider Exhibition at the Science Museum in London


Professor Peter Higgs stands in front of a photograph of the Large Hadron Collider at the Science Museum’s ‘Collider’ exhibition on November 12, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) Continue reading »

Art of Science 2011 Gallery

The Art of Science exhibition explores the interplay between science and art. These practices both involve the pursuit of those moments of discovery when what you perceive suddenly becomes more than the sum of its parts. Each piece in this exhibition is, in its own way, a record of such a moment.

This is the fifth Art of Science competition hosted by Princeton University. The 2011 competition drew 168 submissions from 20 departments. The exhibit includes work by undergraduates, faculty, research staff, graduate students, and alumni.

The 56 works chosen for the 2011 Art of Science exhibition represent this year’s theme of “intelligent design” which we interpret in the broadest sense. These extraordinary images are not art for art’s sake. Rather, they were produced during the course of scientific research. Entries were chosen for their aesthetic excellence as well as scientific or technical interest.

The magnetic field of the Earth has reversed its polarity several hundred times during the past 160 million years. Polarity reversals are known to be strongly irregular and chaotic, and the reversal durations are relatively short (typically a few thousand years) compared with the constant polarity intervals between reversals.

This image shows a simple deterministic model illustrating the geomagnetic reversals. The model is based on the non-linear interaction between two magnetic modes (dipole and quadrupole) and one velocity component of the Earth’s core flow, and the image shows typical trajectories in the 3D phase space. The corresponding strange attractor reproduces irregular reversals between two symmetrical states. (Christophe Gissinger / Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences/ Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Continue reading »

Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking

A revolution is underway in the art of cooking. Just as French Impressionists upended centuries of tradition, Modernist cuisine has in recent years blown through the boundaries of the culinary arts. Borrowing techniques from the laboratory, pioneering chefs at world-renowned restaurants such as elBulli, The Fat Duck, Alinea, and wd~50 have incorporated a deeper understanding of science and advances in cooking technology into their culinary art.

(Click photos to view in HD – depends on your screen resolution).

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Visual Science



Very attractive molecular visualisations and infographic experiences from Visual Science, a professional design service company for medicine, pharmaceutics, nanotechnologies, biotechnology, biology and chemistry areas.