The Tattoo Erasers

Some who are inked have regrets. That’s where lasers come in. New technology is making the removal process easier, and more commonplace.

Ken Saler, a 61-year-old, semi-retired real estate maverick, has reinvented himself. His Advanced Laser Tattoo Removal office in the District has a steady stream of customers, all trying to dial back their everlasting tributes. Dozens of similar tattoo-removal businesses are opening across the country. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Ken Saler uses a Quanta Q-Plus laser on Wayne Stokes, 34, of Baltimore, during a tattoo removal treatment at his office. Stokes wants to remove ink from his face and neck; he said he started getting tattoos when he was 16 to project a tougher image. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Ken Saler uses the laser around the eyes of Wayne Stokes. When the laser hits the body, parts of the skin turn red and then frosted white. The ink crystallizes into smaller particles that will be removed by the immune system. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

“People ask me every day, ‘Why did you do it? Why did you put yourself through that pain of tattooing your entire face?’ ” Wayne Stokes says. “I’ve realized I don’t have to keep that trauma on my body.” (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

The tops of Wayne Stokes’s hands spell out “suffering” when he holds them side by side. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Ken Saler works on the neck of Dave Adams, 36. “Tattoos were viewed as forever,” Adams says. “But now I like the idea that I can treat the skin like an artist can treat a canvas.” (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Ken Saler, left, talks about the tattoos on Dave Adams. Adams wants three removed: a Star of David, a Hindu yantra and an upside-down cross. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Ken Saler uses a laser on Lizeth Pleitez, 30, during her tattoo-removal session. “It was a homemade tattoo done at a party,” Pleitez says of the large pink flower on her lower back. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Ken Saler puts a bandage over Lizeth Pleitez’s lower back tattoo. The removal process could take up to 10 sessions. According to the Pew Research Center, more than 40 percent of Americans between the ages of 26 and 40 have at least one tattoo. (Matt McClain / FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below


If you want more awesome content, subscribe to 'Oh, Design You Trust,' our brand new Facebook page! Trust me, you won't be disappointed.

More Inspiring Stories

Russian Photographer Captured Wonderful Photos While Visiting The Extraordinary Socotra Island
Electric Dreams: Amazing Portraits Of ’80s Geeks
A $2 Million Porsche-Designed RV Has A Full Bedroom And Bathroom
Y40 Deep Joy – the World's Deepest Pool
Nuke Town: Bizarre Colorized Photographs From The Los Alamos National Laboratory Photographic Archives
Stunning Photographs From The Inside Of Russia’s Largest Bitcoin Mine
When Photos Looked Like Paintings: Dreamy Landscape Photographs Taken By Leonard Misonne
Stunning Portraits of Wild Animals by Brad Wilson
Drone Survival Guide
14 Photographs Show How Creepy This Abandoned Mental Asylum In Italy Looks
America’s First Zazzz Marijuana Vending Machine Opens in Seattle
Selena's Rare Coca-Cola Photo Shoot, 1994
Photos Taken at Just the Right Moment
The Miracle of Birth
Photographer Joseph Philippe Bevillard Captured The Secret Lives Of Irish Travellers Revealed In Intimate Portraits
Russian Firefighters Have Released The Most Stunning 2017 Charity Calendar
Kingdom Of Sand: Photographer Captures Apocalyptic Aerial Photos Of Sand-Covered Roads In The United Arab Emirates
Photographer Continues Quest To Document The Diversity Of Beauty Around The World
Photographer Took 12 Pics Of Regular Chinese People To Stop Prejudice And Show That They’re Like All Of Us
Walter Pichler’s Futuristic Visions from the '60s
Hull Residents Paint Themselves Blue For Spencer Tunick Art Installation
Photographer Brent Stirton Captured Magnificent Images Of Mursi Warriors Of The Omo Valley In Ethiopia
"Out Of This World": Photographer Egor Rogalev Visits The Museum Of Soviet Space Travel
Tiny Critter Becomes a Big Wheel
Stunning Chinese Urban Nightscapes By Mark Horn
These Trainers Are Controlled By An App That Lets You Customize Them Whenever You Fancy
Photo of the Day: Typhoon Chan-Hom Lashes China
The Plague Of Overweight: Photographer Martha Holmes Documented The Struggle Of Obesity People In 1950s America
Faces: Fantastic Macro Worlds Of Mofeed Abu Shalwa
Photographer Simon Laveuve