Edwardian London as Seen Through the Eyes of an Unknown Russian Tourist in 1909

London entered the 20th century at the height of its influence as the capital of the largest empire in history, but the new century was to bring many challenges. London was the largest city in the world from about 1825 until it was overtaken by New York City in 1925. Continue reading »

A Collection of Incredible Rare Color Photographs of France in World War I

Serving in the French Army, photographer Fernand Cuville (1887–1927) continued the autochromists’ tradition of recording the world around them in great detail. These color photographs were taken by Cuville in 1917. His photos capture French soldiers in everyday situations, including cleaning their clothes and eating lunch. They also show war’s destruction in scenes of crumbling buildings and ruined landscapes. Continue reading »

Bizarre Pair of Shoes Called “Soles” Ardèche From the Late 19th Century

This footwear, called “Soles”, made in the Ardèche region of France in the 19th century. The soles are heavy duty shoes whose soles are studded with sharp blades. They were in wood for the sole, leather for the portion covering the foot and metal for the dents. Continue reading »

Jack London’s Extraordinary Photos of London’s East End in 1902

Men sleeping in Green Park.

In 1902 the American author Jack London visited his namesake city – at the time when it was still the largest in the world. In a book that became to be known as The People of the Abyss he described the time when he lived in the Whitechapel district sleeping in workhouses, so-called doss-houses and even on the streets. Continue reading »

Mugshots of Сhild Сriminals of Edwardian Britain, 1900-1910

Susan Joice, 16, arrested for stealing money from a gas meter. 1903.

Tyne and Wear Archives & Museum / Juvenile delinquency and the evolution of the British juvenile courts by Kate Bradley, University of Kent

These mugshots of Edwardian Britain depict minors arrested for petty crimes and are part of a wide photographic collection of Tyne Wear Archives. The age of the subjects starts from 12 years old to 21 which was the legal age of adulthood. These minors were arrested in the British town of North Shields. Continue reading »

Arnold Genthe’s Cats : Women Posing With ‘Buzzer’ From A Century Ago

German-born American photographer, Arnold Genthe (January 8, 1869 – August 9, 1942) took a series of photographs of woman posing with his cat. Beginning in 1906, Genthe photographed a number of women with 4 of his cats, all named Buzzer. Continue reading »

Teach Yourself to Draw with The Help of The Man Who Influenced Walt Disney, 1913

“In drawing from this book, copy the last diagram, or finished picture, of the particular series before you,” advises American artist E.G. Lutz (August 26, 1868 — March 30, 1951) in the introduction to his first book What To Draw and How To Draw It (1913). Continue reading »

Amazing Rare Photographs of The Romanovs’ Final Ball In Color, St Petersburg, Russia 1903

The last emperor of Russia Nicolas II dressed in the golden brocade of 17th-century Russian tsar Alexey Mikhailovich, standng with Empress Alexandra Fedorovna. All the jewellery was chosen by court jeweller Carl Faberge.

These portrait photographs of Russia’s ruling Romanovs were taken in 1903 at the Winter Palace in majestic. St. Petersburg. Knowing what was to follow, the venue was apposite. Continue reading »

“Women of The Future” According to The French Artist Albert Bergeret, 1902

In 1902, a French manufacturer released a set of trading cards designed by artist Albert Bergeret that imagined the “women of the future” (original: Les Femmes de l’Avenir). These cards depict various, imagined occupations that would have seemed fantastical to most ladies at the time: doctor, lawyer, politician, firefighter, even members of the military. Continue reading »

Stunning Vintage Photos Of Young Hopi Maidens With Their Traditional Hairstyle From The 1900s And 1910s

The hairstyle is called the Squash Blossom Whorls, or Butterfly Whorls and were worn only by the young Hopi maidens to show that they were unmarried. This complex hairstyle was achieved by the maidens mother, who would wind her hair around a curved piece of wood to give it a round shape, then remove the wood frame. Continue reading »

These Early 1900s Color Autochrome Images Look Like Literal Dreams

1909 “The Japanese parasol.”

John Cimon Warburg/SSPL/Getty Images

Born into a wealthy family, John Cimon Warburg (1867 – 1931) was able to devote his time wholeheartedly to photography because bad asthma stopped him from working in a full time job and a private income gave him economic freedom. He excelled at the autochrome process, giving lectures and writing extensively on the subject. Although never a member of The Linked Ring, he seems to have been something of a linchpin in the photographic world. Continue reading »

Just Before It Was Destroyed By Fire, These Amazing Photos Captured The Cliff House In The Early 1900s

The famous Cliff House of San Francisco was built in 1863 by Senator John Buckley and C. C. Butler. Later it was turned into a restaurant with a breathtaking view. Continue reading »

4K 60Fps Video Shows Colorized Footage Of NYC In 1911

Video editor Denis Shiryaev recently shared a video on his Youtube channel that shows colorized footage of New York City in 1911. The video is a restored version of the footage previously shared by a Swedish film crew from Svenska Biografteatern, which showed an old film slowed down to a natural rate with added sound for ambiance. Continue reading »

Vintage Photos Of People Wearing Masks During The 1918 Influenza Pandemic, One Of The Deadliest Natural Disasters In Human History

At the close of WWI, an estimated 50 million people died from the Spanish flu. Masks were the uninfected’s main line of defense. Continue reading »

In 1909, The Strand Magazine Imagined What Would Happen If Giant Insects Attacked London

The Strand was a monthly magazine of short fiction and general interest articles, a sort of London version of The New Yorker. It was published in the UK from 1891 to 1950, running to 711 issues. The magazine’s offices were on Burleigh Street off The Strand, London, hence the name. Continue reading »

Edwardian Angels: The Pure Beauties From The 1900s

Edwardian girls not only fascinated by their clothing, many of them also had a pure beauty as angels. Check out these lovely vintage photos to see the beauty of young Edwardian girls from the 1900s. Continue reading »

Rare Photos Capture Native Americans In Early 1900s

Early portrait photographs of Native Americans, similar to those presented below, reflect a widespread public interest in Indian life during the 1900s. In the mid-nineteenth century, the popular ‘carte de visite’ photograph introduced the faces of prominent public figures into homes across America. Easily mass-produced, uniformly sized, and cheaper to purchase than early cased photographs, these portraits were collected, in part, as a record of current political and social events and of the people who drove them. These striking images of Native Americans depict the changing ways in which photographers portrayed native subjects during the latter half of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth. These images are attempts by photographers to document what they saw as the fading of Native American cultures and traditions, to illustrate periods of conflict between the U.S. government and the tribes, and, by the twentieth century, to evoke political sympathy for the cause of the “vanishing race.” Continue reading »

San Francisco’s Chinatown In The Early 1900s Through Arnold Genthe’s Lens

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Arnold Genthe (1869 – 1942) was a German-born American photographer, best known for his photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and his portraits of noted people, from politicians and socialites to literary figures and entertainment celebrities. Here are some from his photos of everyday life in San Francisco’s Chinatown in the early 1900s. Continue reading »

Early 1900s Portrait Studio Used Cuddly Cat As Adorable Prop

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Arnold Genthe, a Berlin-born photographer, worked a New York portrait studio. He sought to capture the human essence of his subjects, to go beyond a “commonplace record of clothes and a photographic mask.” He used an unobtrusive camera and would not tell the subject when he was going to make the exposure.
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