In 1909, The Strand Magazine Imagined What Would Happen If Giant Insects Attacked London

The Strand was a monthly magazine of short fiction and general interest articles, a sort of London version of The New Yorker. It was published in the UK from 1891 to 1950, running to 711 issues. The magazine’s offices were on Burleigh Street off The Strand, London, hence the name. Continue reading »

Edwardian Angels: The Pure Beauties From The 1900s

Edwardian girls not only fascinated by their clothing, many of them also had a pure beauty as angels. Check out these lovely vintage photos to see the beauty of young Edwardian girls from the 1900s. Continue reading »

Rare Photos Capture Native Americans In Early 1900s

Early portrait photographs of Native Americans, similar to those presented below, reflect a widespread public interest in Indian life during the 1900s. In the mid-nineteenth century, the popular ‘carte de visite’ photograph introduced the faces of prominent public figures into homes across America. Easily mass-produced, uniformly sized, and cheaper to purchase than early cased photographs, these portraits were collected, in part, as a record of current political and social events and of the people who drove them. These striking images of Native Americans depict the changing ways in which photographers portrayed native subjects during the latter half of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth. These images are attempts by photographers to document what they saw as the fading of Native American cultures and traditions, to illustrate periods of conflict between the U.S. government and the tribes, and, by the twentieth century, to evoke political sympathy for the cause of the “vanishing race.” Continue reading »

San Francisco’s Chinatown In The Early 1900s Through Arnold Genthe’s Lens

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Arnold Genthe (1869 – 1942) was a German-born American photographer, best known for his photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and his portraits of noted people, from politicians and socialites to literary figures and entertainment celebrities. Here are some from his photos of everyday life in San Francisco’s Chinatown in the early 1900s. Continue reading »

Early 1900s Portrait Studio Used Cuddly Cat As Adorable Prop

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Arnold Genthe, a Berlin-born photographer, worked a New York portrait studio. He sought to capture the human essence of his subjects, to go beyond a “commonplace record of clothes and a photographic mask.” He used an unobtrusive camera and would not tell the subject when he was going to make the exposure.
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