Plastic Trash Gets New Life As Art

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

This summer, experience “Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea,” a larger-than-life exhibit of 17 marine wildlife sculptures—from jellyfish to sharks—made entirely of plastic pollution directly recovered from oceans. Placed throughout the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, these massive sculptures represent the more than 315 billion pounds of plastic in oceans, illustrating the devastating effects of the ocean’s deadliest predator—trash. The Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute is committed to saving marine species and is a pioneer in coral research and conservation.

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

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Photo by Keith Lane / The Washington Post

See also: “Fantastic Giant Sculptures Made Entirely Of Beach Waste To Make You Reconsider Plastic Use

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