This Woman Gave A Second Chance To So Many Soldiers Whose Faces Were Severely Injured In World War I – Design You Trust — Design Daily Since 2007

This Woman Gave A Second Chance To So Many Soldiers Whose Faces Were Severely Injured In World War I

World War I caused the death of millions of combatants and civilians, while countless soldiers suffered from injury and disfigurement. Perhaps the most disheartening were facial injuries, as soldiers had to not only deal with the physical loss, but also the constant psychological stress of wondering how people would react to their changed appearance. These men worried about their homecoming — how would strangers react, but more importantly how they would be treated by friends and family.

Surgery and skin grafting was an option for some, but many sustained injuries that went beyond the ability of surgery to repair. These unfortunate soldiers turned to portrait masks. Pioneered by English sculptor Captain Derwent Wood, and improved upon by American sculptor Anna Coleman Ladd, portrait masks were modeled from photographs taken before the injury and were painted in oils to resemble the former features of the patient.

It started in 1917, when Ladd, who was then a sculptor and socialite living in Boston, read about the work of a sculptor who ran what was called the “Tin Noses Shop”, a mask-making studio for disfigured British soldiers. Inspired, Ladd set up her own studio in Paris and set to work sculpting new faces for those who had lost a piece of theirs in trench warfare.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

French soldier whose face was mutilated in World War I, being fitted with a mask made at the American Red Cross studio of Anna Coleman Ladd, 1918:

The top row of casts shows the first step in the process as these were molded from the soldiers’ disfigured faces.The bottom row of casts shows the molds with restorative work sculpted by Anna Coleman Ladd:

A variety of portrait masks produced by Anna Coleman Ladd:

Two soldiers play cards while wearing Ladd’s handiwork:

Before and after with the mask on. The part of the soldier’s body that was most vulnerable was his face, because if he looked up over a trench, that was the part that was going to be hit:

Before and after. The mask was painted to match the skin colo:

Ladd’s papers include these photos of a World War I veteran with and without his mask:

Anna Coleman Ladd and her assistant working on a new mask:

Anna Coleman Ladd and her life-restoring masks:

[Fancy_Facebook_Comments_Pro width="990"]
If you want more awesome content, subscribe to 'Design You Trust Facebook page. You won't be disappointed.

More Inspiring Stories

Guy Transforms 1907 Upright Piano Into A Luxurious Desk
Recycled 3-D Printed Art by Matthew Plummer Fernandez
Sergei Pakhomov Creates Incredible Artworks Made out Of Pasta
The Most Ridiculous Products People Have Made From IKEA Bags
This Old Man Spent 13 Years Growing A Giant Dragon In His Yard
DeskSpace: Handcrafted Solar System Desk Accessory
Nose Warmers Now Exist: Perfect For People Who Are Always Cold
French Fashion ’71: Stunning Women’s Styles From 1971
Europe's First Underwater Sculpture Museum
LEGO’s Gorgeous Colossal Millennium Falcon Set Is A Mind-Numbing 7,541 Pieces
Whoo Could Resist This Cuddly Crochet Owl Blanket?
This Dad Is Going Viral For Matching His Face Masks With Ties Every Day And Here Are His Totally Cool Pandemic-Approved Fashion Looks
Let This Fruit Slice Furniture Juice Up Your Outdoor Living Area
Baker Comes Up With The Spookiest Halloween Pies, And Here Are Her Best Ones
Cradling Hyper-Realistic Babies In Uncanny Valley
Giant Snorlax Cushion Is The Comfiest Pokémon Bed You Can Take A Nap On
Artist Turns Her AirPods Into Earrings In Order to Keep From Losing Them
New Yorker Creates The Funkiest Staircase Ever, And It’s For A Good Cause
Spread Your Wings: Beautiful Shovava Wing Scarves By Roza Khamitova
Compare Orcs And Their Actors In “Warcraft: The Beginning”
The Snowman Carrier - A Special Bag to Carry Your Tiny Snowman
With This Ride-On Trump Costume It Looks Like Donald Is Giving You a Piggyback Ride
Jamie Hannigan Makes Detailed Paper Sculptures Only Using The Pages Of A Book, Usually Depicting An Element Of The Story
Make-Up Artist Turns Himself Into Creepy Horror Versions of Popular Cartoon and Movie Characters