Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest

The Royal Observatory Greenwich has announced the winners of its annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. American photographer Brad Goldpaint beat thousands of amateur and professional photographers from around the world to take the top title. His shot shows immense red rock formations with the Milky Way looming overhead on the right and the Andromeda galaxy on the left. The winning photographs will be exhibited in the National Maritime Museum.

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Overall winner and people and space category winner. Transport the Soul by Brad Goldpaint. (Photo by Brad Goldpaint/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Our moon category winner. Inverted Colours of the Boundary between Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquilitatis by Jordi Delpeix Borrell. (Photo by Jordi Delpeix Borrell/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Stars and nebulae category winner. Corona Australis Dust Complex by Mario Cogo. (Photo by Mario Cogo/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Young category winner. Great autumn morning by Fabian Dalpiaz. (Photo by Fabian Dalpiaz/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Robotic scope category winner. Two Comets with the Pleiades by Damian Peach. (Photo by Damian Peach/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Skyscapes category winner. Circumpolar by Ferenc Szémár. (Photo by Ferenc Szémár/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Our sun category winner. Sun King, Little King and God of War by Nicolas Lefaudeux. (Photo by Nicolas Lefaudeux/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Galaxies category winner. NGC 3521 Mysterious Galaxy by Steven Mohr. (Photo by Steven Mohr/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Aurorae category winner. Speeding on the Aurora lane by Nicolas Lefaudeux. (Photo by Nicolas Lefaudeux/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Best newcomer category winner. Galaxy curtain call performance by Tianhong Li. (Photo by Tianhong Li/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
This stunning runner-up photo captured the glorious night sky above a quiet suburban street. (Photo by Andrew Whyte/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
This hauntingly detailed picture of the moon went far in the competition. (Photo by Casper Kentish/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
This highly commended piece shows off Thackeray’s Globules in Narrowband Colour. (Photo by Rolf Wahl Olsen/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Chuanjin Su’s mesmerising piece of an Eclipsed Moon Trail. (Photo by Chuanjin Su/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
The fantastical Aurora Borealis in Norway. (Photo by Mikkel Beiter/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

Spectacular Winning Photos Of The Astronomy Photographer Of The Year 2018 Contest
Castlerigg Stone Circle near Keswick in Cumbria, snapped by Matthew James Turner. (Photo by Matthew James Turner/2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year)

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