These Maps And Diagrams Will Help You Get Un-Lost

New York-based designer and inventor, Archie Archambault, simplifies complex ideas and constructs through minimalist maps and diagrams, with the added bonus of being aesthetically pleasing.

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“The best way to get un-lost is draw a map,” he writes on his website, explaining that while living in Portland (and mostly getting lost) he drew a circular map of the city which helped him understand better his whereabouts. It was then that the brand Archie’s Press was born.

Having studied Art and Philosophy at Colorado College, Urban Design at Harvard, and Advertising at Wieden+Kennedy, Archambault travels all over the world meeting people and exploring cities. After asking residents a lot of questions and thinking really really hard, he assembles to map, referencing current and past maps.

His original idea has since unfolded into many other maps of different subjects, showing their structures in simple and intuitive ways. “I make letterpress ‘maps from the mind’ of cities, planets, organs, and many other subjects,” he explained in an interview with the Ohh Deer blog. “They’re all super-simple distillations of the complex ideas.”

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🍄 anything else?

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“When I started taking this design practice seriously, I went in a dozen different directions,” he recalled. “Most of it was type and image with quippy or impactful messages. I made things that were funny, clever, crude, and everything in-between, but the maps were by far the biggest hit and I really enjoyed making them. Then my brain became like this map-thinking machine and I stopped thinking about other things.”

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😋😋😋😋😋😋🍣🍣🍣🍣

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What else goes on here?

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This is fragile! Vote!

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I had a lot of hesitation making this map. DETROIT. It's a loaded name. So much of the American idea of America is wrapped up in this place. Cars. Manufacturing. Opportunity. Seasons. House music. Rock and roll. And now it's an archetype of urban decay. I don't pretend to know this place, and I'm not sure it's possible to know it, because it keeps changing. What are these neighborhoods, now that no people are living in them? Is there enough history to maintain the names into the future? Will there be a future for these places? What's the deal with the car industry? The Detroit of 1955 is a completely different place from the Detroit of 2010. I'm open to thoughts on this one. The skeleton of this city is nearly perfect. What still exists? What needs to stay? And what can be left out? I'm tempted to make two versions, one of 1950 and one of 2035. Any thoughts would be appreciated. ❤️❤️❤️

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Boom. Any thoughts?

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