Wolseley-Vickers “Wheel-Cum-Track” Car, 1926

If you’ve ever gotten a car stuck in the mud, snow, or any other kind of slippery surface, then you have an idea of how helpful having tank-style tracks can be in specific scenarios. Obviously, though, there are disadvantages to driving a tank around city streets, but that’s a problem that Wolseley-Vickers attempted to solve with its “Wheel-Cum-Track” car all the way back in 1926.

h/t: vintag.es, thedrive

Equipped with both tracks and regular wheels, the vehicle could be driven around like a traditional car or it could lower its tracks to tackle tougher terrain like a tank. It’s called the Wolseley-Vickers because it’s actually based on a regular Wolseley car, with Vickers adding the track system later on. That being said, it’s not a very aesthetically pleasing combination, to say the least.

Being built in 1926, there’s not much information readily available about it, but we do know it was likely being evaluated for use as a sort of all-terrain staff car. Records from the British Imperial War Museum seem to indicate that the car was tested in trials to determine its capability against a number of other similar vehicles, including offerings from Citroën and different British manufacturers along with Vickers.

Although images of the vehicle in the open-top cabriolet configuration are not available from the British Imperial War Museum, it does have photos of the vehicle in a different configuration. Seeming more tank than staff car this time around, this armored-up version of the vehicle apparently could travel 15 miles per hour on tracks, or 25 on its wheels. Clearly, the added mechanical complexity wasn’t really worth just ten miles per hour.

In the end, one can assume that the need for such a vehicle was satisfied by less-complicated contraptions like half-tracks and smaller, faster tanks. However, the Wolseley-Vickers “Wheel-Cum-Track” car is still an interesting vehicle, and indeed one that was likely as cool to drive as it was complex. It certainly has a unique aesthetic, to say the least.

(Visited 1 times, 2 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below

More Inspiring Stories

An Environmental Island Floating on the Equatorial Pacific
Riding Giant Mechanical Tricycles In 1896
Boeing 787 Dreamliner: The Next-Generation in Flight
Ibuki Is The 10-Year-Old Android Child That Will Haunt Your Dreams
Inside Amazon's Very Hot Warehouse
Inside of Blizzard's Office
The Father’s Nursing Assistant: Japanese Device Allows Fathers To Breastfeed Their Babies
Drone Survival Guide
The 1986 Oldsmobile Incas Had The Wildest Dashboard You've Never Seen
Gold-Painted Infiniti G37 In China Towed By Traffic Police for Illegal Parking
Phoenix Vehicle Made From Bamboo Cane Is The New Green Car
Exploring the Deep Sea
Awesome industrial design projects by Igor Chak
Telekinetic Mindflex Duel Game
Albania's Graveyard Of Soviet-Era MiGs
Spectacular Photos Of The Lost Train Graveyard In Bolivia
Getting Creative as Floodwaters Rise in Thailand
Punkt. DP 01 Cordless Phone
The Real Star Wars Weapon!
Real Life Sized Soviet Era Motorbike Made Of Wood
The Reality of Cloud Computing
The Light Phone
Russian Craftsmen Built This Steampunk Trike Inspired By “Joseph Stalin” Locomotive
Glow-In-The-Dark Underwear Is Exactly What You Need Right Now
This Is How Soviets Imagined 21st Century Will Look Like: The Soviet Eera Sci-Fi Mag That Wanted To Predict The Future
Facebook's New Headquarters in Menlo Park, CA
A Photo Set of The 1960 Dodge Dart Phoenix D-500, a Reflection of The Jet-Age Styling of The Late 1950s
Wonderful Photos Of 1954 Chevrolet Corvair, Which Was Touted As A New Aerodynamic Design
Stunning Photos Show Mercedes-Benz 190 SL's Assembly Line In February 1958
Garia 2+2