Korean Artist Goes Viral For Transforming Herself Into Mind-Bending Optical Illusions Without Any Photoshop – Design You Trust

Korean Artist Goes Viral For Transforming Herself Into Mind-Bending Optical Illusions Without Any Photoshop

When you’re an artist, everything is a canvas. Don’t believe me?

Meet Dain Yoon, a South Korean classically trained painter who uses her own body as a canvas. You might remember us covering her extraordinarily intricate art that makes people look twice at it to fully understand that there’s a face or entire body hiding behind it.

Since then, Yoon’s been hard at work, so here’s a handful of her new art pieces, neatly packed and presented in a curated list below.

And while you’re down there, why not give your favorite ones an upvote and leave a comment on what you thought about them!

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda

Dain Yoon is a South Korean artist who works with a bit of an unorthodox canvas—the human body. Most of the time it’s her own, but sometimes it’s someone else’s.

Regardless, besides the interesting choice of canvas, she’s also versed in all things illusions. Much of her work involves hiding the face so well that people often end up trying to figure out what they are seeing in the first place.

Yoon has always enjoyed painting, it was something that she felt best at, which landed her in some of the most prestigious art schools in South Korea. Everything from scenography to theatrical design to special effects makeup—she did it all, and continues surprising her numerous fans across her social media.

And no, this ain’t photoshop.

“My everyday experiences and point of view of our world is what inspires my illusion series,” Yoon explained the inspiration behind her mesmerizing illusionary art.

“I think the reason my work sparks the reactions it does is because I make sure my work is inspired by true feeling, and I am happy that people are there to receive and be affected by them. I am a very sensitive person and my emotions have always been the source of my inspiration. And painting is the language I express myself in, in the same way as a musician uses music to communicate their emotions.”

Yoon continued: “I get inspired by my feelings, both emotional and physical. Since both of my parents worked day jobs, I had a lot of time to think on my own when I was young. Although everyone feels emotions, I was overly sensitive, to an abnormal extent. So when I started painting from a young age, back when I used to paint on canvases and paper, the subject matter of my work was almost always about people and emotions.”

“I always try to be a better artist than the one I was yesterday. It inspires me to keep my focus on further developing my art.”

As you might have guessed, Yoon’s art is every bit challenging, but it is by no means a bad thing as it’s exactly what drives her to be the best she can be.

“Every art piece has definitely been a challenge. I actually like the word ‘challenge’ a lot, I always try to do new things, and never remain stagnant. I really work hard and I think my life and career have developed a lot because of it. As time went on, my perspective on art has grown, and it led me to do things on a bigger scale, and different types of mediums as well. And I definitely look forward to many more opportunities to come.”

Believe it or not, there have been times when Yoon would go out wearing one of her illusions. Like, people could see it. So, we asked her how people reacted and she had this to say:

“It was very different depending on the cities and countries. The first time was in Seoul, I remember the majority of people were scared of me,” laughed Yoon. “The warmest welcome and recognition was in New York, though!”

So, we’ve pushed Yoon into a corner and asked her to choose one favorite design from the myriad of pieces that she has done over the years: “Most of my works have received lots of coverage around the world. But, if I had to pick one, I would say my ‘Hair Nails’ because it brought me on the Ellen Show.”

“Also, I would say my art performance at Seoul Art Center. This performance was an extended version of my illusion body paintings. I wanted to do my own performance for a long time and when I had the chance, I went for it.”

“I composed my own team. Brought in a choreographer, composer, cinematographer, designer, and 12 performers, including myself. It was a great, new challenge.”





















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