This 19th-Century Tool Box Is Meticulously Designed To Hold 300 Tools


reddit

The look of tool chests can tell us much about workers and workplaces. While their purpose is to organize, carry, and protect tools, this chest also suggests what a worker thinks of himself and how society measures the value of his work.

h/t: phoenixmasonry, mymodernmet


phoenixmasonry

If the workmanship in a tool chest is any indication of the maker’s talent, then the craftsmanship of Master carpenter and Freemason H. O. Studley must have been awe-inspiring. Brother Henry O. Studley (1838-1925) built this magnificent wall-hung chest while employed by the Poole Piano Company of Quincy, Massachusetts.


phoenixmasonry

In an oak clamshell box adorned with rosewood, ebony, pearl and ivory, Studley kept both tools he made and a collection of the finest hand tools made prior to 1900, including a complete set of woodworking tools as well as machinist and stonemasonry tools. To pack the 300-plus tools into a case only 19 1/2 inches wide, 39 inches long and 9 1/2 inches deep, Studley devised a jigsaw puzzle arrangement of flip-up trays, fold-out layers and hidden compartments. Maine native Pete Hardwick originally owned the chest, which had been in his family since it was bequeathed to his grandfather by Studley.


phoenixmasonry

Hardwick acquired the chest from his brother by trading a 1934 Ford sedan for it. A good trade? It would seem so: just one tool – the Stanley No. 1 plane housed in the ebony archway in the upper-left part of the chest – was appraised at $700.00 in 1993.


phoenixmasonry/Woodworking Magazine, May 1993

This tool chest was carefully restored to its original splendor and glory, loaned to the Smithsonian Institution, then displayed in the National Museum of American History as the centerpiece of woodworking and other tradesman tool chests. Studley’s chest then changed hands again (for an undisclosed $$$ amount) to another private collector.


phoenixmasonry/Woodworking Magazine, May 1993


phoenixmasonry/Woodworking Magazine, May 1993


phoenixmasonry/Woodworking Magazine, May 1993

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below


If you want more awesome content, subscribe to 'Oh, Design You Trust,' our brand new Facebook page! Trust me, you won't be disappointed.

More Inspiring Stories

Musician Builds Guitar out Of His Dead Uncle’s Skeleton, Uses It to Play Black Metal!
Artist Jeff Koons Installs A Giant Inflatable Ballerina In The Heart Of New York
This Sculptural Coat Rack Design Was Inspired By Waltz Dancing
The Retired Teacher Has Converted His Council Flat Into A Stunning Home, Complete With Mosaics Inspired By Gaudí
"How Do You Feed Spirits?": These Haunting Sculptures Of Children Will Send Chills Down Your Spine
Retro DIY Lawnmower Looks Like A Vintage Car
Everyone Needs A Niffler Necklace
Creative Fashion Designs by Kansai Yamamoto in the Early 1970s
New Grid-Bonsai Trees Let You Enjoy Traditional Japanese Art As A Puzzle
Anime Style Body Paint Model Dazzles With The Most Colorful Fashion In Japan
Graphic Designer Turns Transit Networks Around The World Into Minimalist Maps
Artist John Marshall Made These Selfie Cardboard Cutouts At Sunset To Get You In The Mood
LEGO Vehicles Take Over The Streets Of Rome
This Lighting Collection Is Designed To Look Like Sausages In A Butcher Shop
This Special Park In Ireland Is Filled With Statues That’ll Give You Nightmares
Amazing Vintage Photos That Show How Life Before AutoCAD Looked Like
Hungarian Graphic Design Student Barbara Bernat Redesigns the Euro
Stunning Diorama Table Features Pieces From Tabletop World
Beautiful Laser Engraved Rolling Pins By Zuzia Kozerska
Craftsman Makes An Incredible Stained Glass Octopus Chandeliers
Which Ikea Media Storage Unit Will Be Able to Fit My New, Meme-Ishly Oversized, Game Console?
"Brutal Beauty": This Russian Craftsman Makes Unique Steampunk Art From Steel And Crude Iron
Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car of the Future
Santa Wants to Keep You and His Friends at The North Pole Safe This Christmas so He's Wearing a Mask
Banksy Inspired Wall Stickers
The First Design-Protected Original AK47 Chair
Artist Creates Minimalist Masterpieces Out Of Food, Then Eats Them
Amazing Animal Ski Masks By Teya Salat
The Stunning Beauty Of London Floors Or Why You Should Look Down While Travelling
Eco Street Murals By NEVERCREW Duo