Next Gen Pollution & Viral Filtration Mask With Botanicals

Australian designed, botanically infused, designer masks. Ergonomic, highly breathable, and reusable. Blocks over 97% of PM2.5.

AusAir was created by two brothers Elias Honor and Isaac Honor, and their lifelong friend Jack Graham. When travelling overseas, they experienced unhealthy air pollution first hand. To protect themselves, they looked for a stylish, breathable and functional mask but couldn’t find any.

More: AusAir, Kickstarter

After years of looking into the problems with current masks, testing new designs and prototyping, AusAir was born. The result is a mask which offers unparalleled breathability, filtration and style.

It’s a mask with a difference. With reusable, washable skins designed to complement any outfit, and changeable filters infused with Australian botanicals, this is no ordinary mask.

Not only does AusAir filter over 97% of small airborne pollution (PM2.5), prevent the spread of infection and protect your face, but it comes jam packed with amazing features.




“The biggest pollution concern in terms of your health comes down to tiny hazardous particles suspended in the air called ‘particulate matter’. Some of the most potent of these particles is called PM2.5 meaning that these particles are less than 2.5 microns. To put this into perspective, a micron is a millionth of a metre, with a human hair being around 70 microns.”

“Our filter range embeds botanicals sourced from Australian farms which offer subtle flora scents and other botanical benefits. Each filter harnesses the naturally evolved properties of the embedded botanical.”

“Based on a body of scientific literature, choose the O2Plus filter which suits your needs. And for those of you who just want to breathe in pure air, we have a blank filter for you too. Our botanical filters are the same as the standard filters but with added botanical benefits.”



For maximum efficiency and hygiene, filters last up to 100 hours or between 2-4 weeks depending on use. The filters are interchangeable with your washable mask skin, so you can choose the filter you want when you want.

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