Stunning and Rare Images of The 1935 Adler Diplomat 8 Wheels

The Adler Diplomat is a substantial six-cylinder “limousine” built by the Frankfurt auto-maker, Adler. It was introduced in March 1934 as a direct replacement for the manufacturer’s Standard 6. Less directly the six-cylinder Diplomat also replaced the Adler Standard 8 since Adler’s large eight-cylinder car was discontinued in 1934 without a direct replacement of its own.

The Diplomat initially, in 1934, took over the body from the previous year’s Adler Standard 6. However, the Standard Six had received an all new body for its final year of production, and for keen eyed observers the final year’s Standard Six was differentiated from the first year’s Diplomat by redesigned fender aprons. The chassis which had been a defining feature of the 1933 Standard 6 had been of an underslung design whereby the axles emerged directly above the principal chassis members: this allowed for a lower centre of gravity and a lower-bodied car than the overslung chassis, with axles mounted directly below the chassis, which had left the earlier Standard Six looking unfashionably high-bodied in the early 1930s.

h/t: vintag.es

The four-door “Limousine” (sedan/Saloon) came with an all-steel body from Ambi-Budd, the country’s largest specialist steel body producer, based in the Spandau district of Berlin. A longer wheel base six light “Pullman-Limousine” with six seats was also offered, its body probably also from Ambi-Budd. There were in addition two cabriolet-bodied cars offered.

For 1935 the Diplomat received new bodywork which now featured a bulging (and more streamlined) front grill and more shapely wings over the wheels. The six-light limousine still had a relatively vertical rear, but the other cars now had a far more streamlined tail section than the 1934 Diplomats. The 1935 upgrade left the car with longer overhangs, notably at the back, which increased the car’s length by 150 mm (5.9 in). However, the 3,200 mm (130 in) and 3,350 mm (132 in) wheelbase, respectively for four-seater and six-seater cars, was not changed in 1935.

The four front wheels of this novel car turn in unison for steering. The wheels are grouped in two sets of four each at the front and rear of the machine—an arrangement imposing an unusual mechanical problem in the design of steering apparatus. The inventor has overcome this difficulty by adapting the two forward pairs of wheels so that they swing in unison for making turns.

The Adler Diplomat was no longer offered for sale in 1939, although records show that a few cars were built on 1939 and in 1940, presumably for military use or export.

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave Your Comment Below


If you want more awesome content, subscribe to 'Oh, Design You Trust,' our brand new Facebook page! Trust me, you won't be disappointed.

More Inspiring Stories

Rusty 1961 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster Barn Find Sells For Staggering $800,000
Tesla Model S: World’s First Electric Sedan Hits Road
Inside Of The Antonov Aircraft Plant In Kiev
Innovative Bike Doubles As Washing Machine To Clean Your Clothes As You Exercise
Martin Caulfield Services Some Of The Last Remaining Gas Street Lamps In The Capital
Introducing Foodini: A 3D Food Printer
E-Ink Powered Watches
That's Top Gear - Mechanic Spends Almost $300,000 Converting Rust Bucket Into Astonishing Custom Car
70th Anniversary Citroen H Van
Supercool Pics Of Bugatti Cars In The 1920s And 1930s
Camera Van: The Art Car by Harrod Blank
Unseen Titanic: First Ever Complete Views of the Wreck
Former Chinese Farmer Builds Flying Saucer
This Japanese Machine Gun Camera Was Used In World War II
This Futuristic 1966 Ford Ranger II Concept Truck
"Hello Kitty" Air Jet by EVA Airways
Concepts From Future Past: Alfa Romeo Carabo, 1968
One Of About 50 Fiat 599 Ferves Rangers Still Around!
World's Largest Plane Fires Up Its Six Engines For The First Time
Luxury 'Doomsday Bunker' Will Allow 34 Super Rich Families To Survive The Apocalypse
iPad App Gives Users Superman-Style X-Ray Vision
Closer Than We Think: 40 Visions Of The Future World According To Arthur Radebaugh
Vintage Photographs of the Skiway Sky Bus Lift Used on Mt. Hood, Oregon From the 1950s
Amazing Vintage Photos Of The Grateful Dead’s Wall Of Sound, 1974
Alien-like Flowers Seen Under the Microscope
Man Puts V8 Lexus Engine And Automatic Transmission On A Bike
"Learning To Fly": Gorgeous Vintage Photos Of Early NASA Facilities
World's First Smart Virtual Store Opens in Korea
E3 2014 - Electronic Entertainment Expo
Chinese Submersible 'Jiaolong' Dives to 22 851ft in The Mariana Trench